Spring – Trailer

Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead‘s Spring is an apt trailer to post since just earlier this week I was writing about H.P. Lovecraft.

The movie revolves around (Lou Taylor Pucci) who meets Louise (Nadia Hilker) in Italy, and falls madly in love.  Sure, it’s weird that Evan can only see her at night, but what relationship doesn’t have its quirks?

Though if that were Louise’s only problem, Spring wouldn’t be much of a movie.  The added bit is that it seems that she…changes at certain times to something not quite human.

It sounds like vintage Lovecraft, and until Guillermo Del Toro makes his At The Mountains Of Madness, I’ll take it though I get the feeling that Spring is not going to get a theatrical release.

Is Jesse Eisenberg Miscast as Lex Luthor?

A picture has turned up of Jesse Eisenberg, who’s going to be playing Lex Luthor in the upcoming Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and he looks pretty “meh.”

Jesse Eisenberg as Lex Luthor

The main problem is that Luthor has traditionally been cast by actors like Gene Hackman (who played the character in 1978’s Superman) and Kevin Spacey (who played him in 2006’s Superman Returns) and I think there’s a very good reason that older, more experienced actors were cast.

Namely they bring a level of experience, of gravitas and maturity that Eisenberg doesn’t have, mainly because it comes with age.

And traditionally it’s not something that you can act your way around.

Eisenberg is a smart and capable actor, but he doesn’t look like Lex Luthor to me.  in my mind’s eye I can already see him running about, like a bald version of the character he played in 2010’s The Social Network and know that whomever that chararcter is, it won’t be Lex Luthor.

By the way, does Zach Snyder have something against older people?  The reason I ask is that most of his films–casting wise–seem to skew toward attractive, relatively speaking, younger people.

Help Us, Guillermo Del Toro, You’re Our Only Hope!

And in case you don’t get the reference…

And you should know that I don’t take to paraphrasing Princess Leia lightly, though I think that it’s warranted in this particular case.

Call Girl Of Cthulhu trailer

The point being, I have just seen the trailer for Call Girl of Cthulhu and it looks to be in the vein of movies like Re-Animator and From Beyond, by which I mean the gory, gooey stuff is mixed with liberal doses of humor and/or camp, though I am not implying either of them aren’t entertaining and gory-good fun.

Though what they lack is a sense of the majestic, the feeling that they what we see on screen is only the tip of the iceberg and that the horrors out there in the vastness of space are way more horrific than we can even contemplate.  It’s present in Lovecraft’s writing–and especially in August Dereth’s–though no movie has dealt with the more cosmic aspects of his writing–though John Carpenter’s In The Mouth of Madness, has been the closest.

As far as the other movies go, there’s a certain tawdriness that’s not touched on in any of his writing that I have read–be they written by Lovecraft or not.

At The Moutains Of Madness 1

At The Mountains Of Madness 2

Two images of Guillermo Del Toro’s (so far) aborted film of H.P. Lovecraft’s At The Mountains of Madness

And that’s not to say that the sexiness that seems a part of Call Girl of Cthulhu isn’t present in someone’s writings, but I would at least like to see some of mysticism, the subtle horror evoked by his writings.

Which is why I plead to Guillermo del Toro to please bring At The Mountains Of Madness to the big screen because as far as I can tell no other filmmaker has the understanding of the Mythos, as well as the respect for its creator, to do it justice.

From what I have read of Del Toro’s take he intended to treat perhaps the seminal Lovecraft story with the piousness and gravitas that it deserves, and it’s about time.

The (Un)necessary Remake Dept: The Nun (La Monja)

The Nun movie posterLuis de la Madrid‘s 2005 ghost story The Nun (La Monja) isn’t a terrible movie by any stretch, though that’s not to imply that it’s particularly good, because it isn’t.

Though the greater crime is that there are stirrings of greatness not too far below the surface, which are never given a chance to bloom into horrific life.

First off, the movie shows its ghost with the most way too much, though I think I understand why.

Whenever the ghost appears it’s accompanied by an interesting visual effect: water flowing backward and in slow motion, filling the air like a curtain of light.  The problem is that, once you have seen the bogeyman, it–if not loses all power to frighten certainly suffers diminished potency–and you begin to see it for what it is, namely an interesting visual effect and little else.

Often, particularly in the case of horror films which by their very nature depend upon the suspension of belief, less is more.  If the film had–instead of showing their monster at seemingly every available opportunity–had instead showed some restraint, the movie would have benefitted immensely.

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Leviathan – Trailer

I was reading Deadline: Hollywood earlier today when I noticed that Ruairi Robinson has landed a development deal based upon the video for his short, Leviathan.

If you’ve been reading this blog, you’ll recall that I featured Robinson’s The Silent City, a few years ago.  I’ve reposted it below.

The thing is, Ruairi Robinson does great trailers, but his feature work tends to be a bit lacking.  For instance, his last movie, The Last Days On Mars (currently on Netflix) got a 20% on Rottentomatoes.com, though I thought that it deserved better.

Another interesting thing is that the story reminded me of quite a few others, such Melville’s Moby Dick, The Stars, Mine Enemy! by Roy Thomas from The Rampaging Hulk and Abraxas and the Earthman by Rick Vetch, from Marvel’s Epic Illustrated.

The Rampaging Hulk

Abraxas

The latter two revolving around a hunt for creatures that can best be called ‘space whales.’

Mission Impossible 5: Rogue Nation – Teaser Trailer

As someone who’s enjoyed the television show that the Mission Impossible movies are based on it has always bothered me that the movies are essentially the Tom Cruise Show.  Sure, there’s a supporting cast, but unlike in the series, they’re there entirely to support Cruise’s Ethan Hunt.

I understand that he’s a big star–though by no means as huge as he was when this series began–but the ensemble nature of the series is what made it so interesting.

As it stands, I enjoy the movies, but it’s Mission Impossible in name only.

I was also reading an article somewhere that implied that the upcoming Star Wars: Rogue may have ta name change because it’s already taken.

I am not sure that I buy that, if only because–if the fifth Mission Impossible is successful, which is highly likely–then another movie with ‘Rogue’ in the title won’t make a whit of difference.

Now, if they were going to put ‘Mars’ in the title, I could see why the producers of the upcoming Star Wars movie might want to consider a title change because from Mars Needs Moms to John Carpenter’Ghosts of Mars, it’s the kiss of death.

And let’s not forget John Carter, which was based on Edgar Rice Burroughs’ A Princess of Mars.

Animal – Review

Animal movie poster

“”Animal” doesn’t break any new ground, but it is attractive to look at, and has some great pratical creature effects.”

Anyone who’s read this blog knows that I don’t particularly enjoy features from The Asylum.  For those unfamiliar with the company they produced movies like Sharknado, all those Mega Shark movies, as well as ZNation.

My problem isn’t that they are blatantly low-budget, it’s that they don’t seem to accept it–relying on cheap-looking digital elects way more often than they should–and also don’t seem to understand that using fewer special effects would work out better than lots of cheesy digital ones.

Most of their output turns up on the Syfy Channel, which isn’t a bad thing because I am not sure anyone else would want it.

Though Syfy isn’t the only channel that caters to genre-based entertainment.  There’s also Chiller, which is more focused on horror.  From what I have seen of their original productions–while they’re not Asylum bad–they’re generally pretty mediocre.

Then I saw Animal and have to admit that it was pretty good.  

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