Are Facebook and YouTube Part Of The Piracy Problem?

Facebook logoThe rules, as far as pirating content on either Facebook or YouTube goes, I find very odd and very inconsistent.  For instance, five or six months ago, I posted a video that I made from a trip to the National Air and Space Museum.  I filmed some of the exhibits and set them to music–Cy Curnin’s Strange Ways, a most awesome song from an even more awesome albumand posted the video to Facebook, when it was soon pulled.

I later learned that this was because of the musical accompaniment.

Now my question is: I clearly didn’t ask Curnin to use his song, though is that the same as ‘stealing’ content?

And isn’t stealing in some ways is similar to murder, in that you can’t murder someone by accident (though you could not intend to kill someone, which the law recognizes as manslaughter– despite its obviously patriarchal origins).

Though back on point, considering that I purchased the music that I used in the video, wasn’t my usage only an extension of the rights that accompanied that purchase in the first place?

Or do I, as someone who’s actually purchased the song, have any rights at all as far as its usage goes?

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Steve Jobs – Official Trailer 1

Michael Fassbender appears to be an excellent Steve Jobs in Steve Jobs.  That being said, the trailer seems to spend a bit of time focusing on some of his more…unsavory behaviors, such has the way he was a dick toward his ex.  It comes off a bit unseemly, though I guess as long as it’s balanced by him not acting like a total ass–or being innovative–it’s all buena.

Besides, if you don’t include instances of his ego running rampant then the movie would play like a Hallmark card, which anyone at all familiar with the mercurial former head of Apple Computer would tell you isn’t quite true.

What I am certain about is that Danny Boyle is a great director, and the fact that he’s helming it should result on a pretty intense journey into the heart of the Apple.

Secret In Their Eyes – Trailer

Chiwetel Ejiofor (a name that is much easier to type than it is to say) MUST become a huge star one of these days, and if Secret In Their Eyes doesn’t do it, then my money is on Marvel Studios’ upcoming Benedict Cumberbatch starrer, Doctor Strange.

I think that I first saw him in Joss Whedon’s Serenity, and he was pretty good there; though if the trailer is any indication this guy is primed to explode any movie now.

That is, if there’s any justice in the universe–which I guess depends upon where you stand.

Magic Mike XXL – Review

“Magic Mike XXL” is in many ways a pretty enjoyable movie. Channing Tatum, despite seeming to be physically imposing, moves in a manner that belies his size and makes him seem really personable–more so than I am accustomed to seeing him–and the whole cast seemed to be having a good time, which shows.

And for some that’s all they want from a movie, so it works on that level.

That being said, it’s almost surreal how unreal the movie feels. I’m accustomed to movies revolving around strippers (or any other field so pornography-adjacent) to have some sort of an edge, and not to feel like it’s suffering from a serious case of Disneyfication.

What I would have liked to have seen would have been somewhat evocative of Times Square before all the peepshows and porno theaters were gentrified out of existence; a portrayal of slightly damaged people, overcoming the odds.

But that’s not what we get here, mainly because one of the things Magic Mike XXL lacks is any sense of threat, of danger, which typically goes hand-in-hand with sexiness. Here it’s all about the tease, which is nothing if not frustrating (though it didn’t appear to bother the woman sitting next to me, who was REALLY into it).

In Mike’s world all the men are either strong, confident, witty, capable, agile, philosophical or really good singers (sometimes embodying all of those characteristics in one individual, if Ken (Matt Bomer) or Mike (Tatum) are any indication.

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Paranormal Activity: Ghost Dimension – Trailer

Let’s be honest.  The Paranormal Activity movies are pretty bad.  Sure, they vary where they sit on the suckometer, but what’s a given is the suckage. And i know that I maybe should be more grateful that horror movies are getting their due, but making really bad ones aren’t, in the long run, helping anyone because people are just going to stop paying to see them–or pirate them, which is worse in its way. I mean, I PAID to see Ouija, and felt a bit violated (though the sequel is being written by Mike Flanagan, who did the far better Oculus, so I might take a chance on it. The bastards) and for most people, unlike me apparently, it’s “trick me once, shame on me.  Trick me twice, same on you.”

Spring – Review

Spring movie poster

“Be careful who you love, because Spring is coming and it’s a monster.”

Some critics has described Spring as ‘Lovecraftian,’–which is what drew me to it in the first place–and while a very good movie, Lovecraftian it’s not.  For it to be so would imply that it was based on, or somehow similar or related to, the work of H.P. Lovecraft and his Cthulhu Mythos.

And it’s not, not in the least.  Sure there are monsters, some even of the aquatic variety, and lots of water; but if that made a movie Lovecraftian, then Steven Spielberg’s Jaws could be as well (which it most definitely isn’t).

Because for a movie to be called so would mean that it not only involves monsters, but embody some of the underlying ideas of Lovecraft’s Mythos, which typically revolves around sinister forces aligned against humankind, whether on a larger or  smaller scale.

Now what Spring is is an awesomely taut, interesting love story.  It’s also best watched twice because you can see the care with which Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson craft their story.  There’s virtually no wasted frames in the entire movie, with everything you see either helping to contribute to a feeling of dread or sell the underlying premise.

Though it’s not perfect, with its weakest scene being the one where Louise (Nadia Pilker) looks into supernatural means to cure her…condition.  The problem isn’t the scene in and of itself, more so than if a person had lived as long as she had, she’d probably have tried it already (though in the movie’s defense she might have done so because she found herself growing closer to Evan (Lou Taylor Pucci) and wasn’t thinking straight.

It’s no accident that that title of the movie is Spring, because the themes of death and rebirth run through the entire movie, most often in a very clever fashion.

The season of Spring has begun on iTunes, though be careful because while love may be eternal, you’re not.