‘Tusk’ Trailer

Tusk comes courtesy of Kevin Smith, a director that I find more interesting as a media personality than as a director.  The last film of his I saw, Red State, I recall being disappointed over because it advertised itself as one thing–a horror film–when it was actually quite another–essentially a thriller about religious zealots.

His most recent effort appears to be vaguely similar to Stephen King’s Misery, in that someone (Justin Long) is held captive by a nutcase, though in this case it seems that the protagonist is less interested in breaking bones than changing the very form of his captive.

Into a walrus, by surgical means, if the trailer is at all accurate.

Looks like fun.

‘Hot Tub Time Machine 2′ Red Band Trailer

You don’t watch a movie called Hot Tub Time Machine expecting any sort of high-brow humor–and if you did it’s all on you because there wasn’t any be found–but what you did get was three actors thrown in the pretty bizarre situation, and their idiosyncratic ways of coping and adapting.

When you think about it, it could actually be the Citizen Kane of hot tub time machine movies.

The first time around apparently appealed to more people than just me, because Lou (Rob Corddry), Nick (Craig Robinson) and Jacob (Clark Duke, which can’t be the name he was born with) are back in Hot Tub Time Machine 2.

This time around it seems that the guys have, predictably, fraked up the future.  This really bothers someone (whom I am willing to bet is either Nick or Jacob), who then attempts to kill Lou.  Nick and Jacob get Lou back into the time machine, and attempt to stop the would-be killer.

It goes without saying that they bring their own special brand of incompetence to the proceedings.

‘Patrick’ Review

Patrick: Evil Awakens

Some Memories, And Coma Patients, Are Best Left Alone

Mark Hartley‘s Patrick, is currently on Netflix, and is surprisingly a engaging little horror film (before it jumps the rails, that is).  I was expecting something silly, on the level of an Asylum feature, it was actually pretty engaging, before the aforementioned rail jumping.

Charles Dance brought a much needed sense of dread and gravitas to things, and he reminded me somewhat of Peter Cushing of Christopher Lee, both of whom possessed the ability to make sub-par material at least interesting.

Unfortunately, no one–other than the writers, or maybe Edward Norton–can do anything to make a silly story less so, or help a movie regain the goodwill its lost (misplaced somewhere around the half-way mark).

Events unfold place almost entirely in a moody villa that houses the Roget Clinic, where Doctor Roget (Dance) experiments on his patients, assisted by his daughter, Matron Cassidy (Rachel Griffiths).

As of late the doctor seems particularly preoccupied by Patrick (Jackson Gallagher), whom was somehow put in a comatose state after murdering his mother and her lover.

Roget is particularly fond of electroshock therapy, as well as a drug that will look eerily familiar to anyone that’s seen Re-Animator.  If he’s able to bring Patrick out of his coma, it will prove that his theories are correct, and enable him to regain the fame and notoriety he once had before a fall from grace (something involving illegal experiments probably similar to those he’s currently performing, I’d guess).

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‘The Gallery of Horrors Bundle’ StoryBundle

Gallery of Horrors Bundle

Ripping a still-beating heart from the chest cavity that shelters it, as the blood washes all over you in a warm, red fountain.  It runs in rivulets, like miniature water falls, down your face; some even winds its way toward your open mouth.

The penny-copper tastes coats your tongue before making its way down your throat.  At first you double over, gaging for a moment before feelings of revulsion are soon replaced by a sated feeling that–before now–you’ve been entirely unacquainted with.

If reading about such terrors is your idea of entertainment–it’s definitely mine–then The Gallery of Horrors Bundle is for you.

The books are offered by StoryBundle, and contains six books by writers such as Martin Kee, Brent J. Tally, and Tanya Eby.

Now here’s the cool part.  If you pay more than $12 for the Bundle, you get three bonus books:  Irregular Creatures by Chuck Wendig, I, Zombie by Hugh Howie and The Red Church by Scott Nicholson.

I can’t speak for everyone, but the scariest thing that I can think of would be to let such an awesome bundle of eBooks (readable in iBooks–my preference–or Kindle, Kobo or any other reader that accepts .epub or .mobi files) go away.

‘The Hunger Games: Mockingjay’ Part 1 Teaser Trailer

“Part 1?”  I think that that refers to the fact that the movie is being broken into a ‘Part 1′ and ‘Part 2.’  What I like about is that there’s an undeniable fascist (a word used way too often, mostly by people with either no idea what it means, or with the intent do bring about dissension) tinge to it that’s played perfectly.

Then there are the propagandistic aspects, such as the emphasis on certain words, like “unity,” “prosperity” and “sacrifice.” I was also wondering for awhile if Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) was computer generated, till he moved toward the end.

All in all, a very effective trailer.

‘Godzilla’ Review

Godzilla (2014) movie poster

Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla Isn’t The Same Monster Many Of Us Grew Up Watching, Which Sometimes Isn’t A Good Thing

In The Beginning…

I remember when I was growing that I spent many Saturday afternoons in front of a television, watching monsters like Gamera, Mothra and Godzilla.  They tended to have come into being due to the hubris of Man, as well as our tendency to use nuclear weapons, which inevitably got out of hand.

Though Mothra was most interesting because, besides being a giant moth, it was summoned by these two tiny women.  And by ‘tiny’ I mean literally small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, which made no sense at all.  Then again, Gamera could not only breath fire, but when he retracted his legs, arms and head into his shell he was capable of flight.  So really, can I complain about two micro-women all that much?

The first movies that dealt with both Gamera and Godzilla were fairly serious things, seeing that they were analogies about the dangers of nuclear weapons (which makes sense when you take into account Japan was the only nation that was attacked using them).

So if anyone was able to comment upon such things with authority, it’s the Japanese.

But a funny thing happened…as the adventures of Godzilla continued, they got goofier.  And when I write ‘goofy’ I mean that when Godzilla wasn’t throwing karate kicks, seemingly held aloft by his massive tail or talking smack at MechaGodzilla (via hand signals and attitude), he was hanging out with a baby Godzilla who instead of breathing fire, breathed smoke rings (unless you stepped on his tail, then look out).

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Edgar Wright Has Left Marvel’s ‘Ant-Man!’

The Astonishing Ant-ManIt’s all over the Interwebs that Edgar Wright (Shawn Of The Dead, Hot Fuzz, The World’s End) has left Marvel Studios’ Ant-Man over “creative differences.”  While I think that this wasn’t a great move on Wright’s part–Marvel Studios movies tend to be huge, virtually guaranteeing that their whomever directs one of them access to bigger and better things, like Jon Favreau and Alan Taylor–I am less concerned than some.

The reason being, Wright brings a particular visual sense to things, though it’s nothing that can’t be replaced.

If the last time he worked on a Hollywood feature (2011’s The Green Hornet) didn’t make him never want to do it again, Michel Gondry would be an interesting choice.

‘Big Hero 6′ Teaser Trailer

Sunfire & Big Hero Six For the first time Pixar is taking on a Marvel property.  Big Hero 6 is a superhero team that–at least in the comics–has ties to Marvel’s X-Men.  In fact, the comic where they first appeared was called “Sunfire & Big Hero 6.”

Sunfire being a mutant from the X-Men comics.

And seeing that connection and the fact that mutants, like Sunfire and the X-Men, are licensed to Twenty-First Century Fox it implies that the contacts are either a bit labyrinthine (or convoluted, depending upon how you look at such things) and you can never be too certain which characters licensees can or cannot use.

And after watching the trailer you can tell that they’re taking a few liberties with the material, though I like what I see because it’s a really amusing trailer.

Respect The Content

Recently I noticed that a web site, Tinseltown News, had taken at least two of my blog posts, Are Universal And Legendary Making A Movie Based On Marvel’s Namor The Submariner and Blood Glacier Trailer.

Now, I don’t mind that someone links to my posts, after all, that’s one reason that I write them.

But the web site pulls entire posts that means that there’s no reason whatsoever to drop by, because it’s all right there.

And the thing is, if the administrator had asked I would have probably said ‘No,’ but at least there would have been the implication that they respected the content of others enough that they asked.

And WordPress, much to my dismay, can’t do anything about it (though they can help by offering steps you can take in case you find someone doing it).  That’s why my blogs have copywrite notices now.

I regularly link to Youtube pages and use pictures relevant to what I am doing from all over the place, so how am I any different?

Well, in some pretty significant ways.  First, I may refer to someone else’s writing, or link to it, but I don’t take their writing in its entirety because I try to offer something that at least aims toward originality.  I may not always hit the mark, but that’s the goal.

And in reference to pictures, I generally acknowledge where I got them from, and if I were every asked to remove one I would because I had no intention of using something that someone has a problem with.

 

‘Monster 2: Dark Continent’ Trailer

It’s interesting how things go sometimes.  Recently in my Postmortem column I wrote about Garth Edwards’ Monsters, and a few days later learned of the existence of its sequel, Monsters 2: Dark Continent.

Edwards, being that he was more than likely working on Godzilla, was replaced as director by Tom Green.

The trailer has virtually no aliens in it till the end, and yet it still seems to have more than appeared in the first movie, though till that time the trailer looks like scenes assembled from movies like Jarhead (which interestingly enough has a sequel too, Jarhead 2: Field Of Fire) or The Hurt Locker.  At the moment I am wondering how it is that there are aliens what I assume is somewhere in Africa because the original film was based entirely on the premise that the monsters came to earth in a NASA probe that broke up over Mexico.

The creatures that turn up are also smaller, which has the effect of making the action more human-scale (though unfortunately evoking comparisons with Paul Verhoeven’s Starship Troopers as well).

And while geography may not be my strongest suit, I am reasonably certain that that the Africa is nowhere near Mexico.