Pixels – Trailer 2

I’ve got to admit that despite the presence of Adam Sandler in a movie virtually guaranteeing that it’s going to appeal to the lowest possible denominator, I am hoping for Pixels.

Maybe it’s the presence of Chris Columbus (the director of Home Alone, Adventures in Babysitting, two Harry Potter movies, etc) and actors like Josh Gad, Sean Bean and Peter Dinkage that, working their hardest, they’ll will be able to generate enough comic energy to escape the blackhole-like pull that is Sander’s mediocrity.

I doubt it, but I can dream.

Zombeavers – Review

Zombeavers movie poster

“Watch If Just So You Can Say You Do Did (Or You Really Like Bill Burr).  Other Than That, I’ve Got Nothin.'”

Bill Burr!  Bill Burr is one of the first people you see when Zombeavers starts, and maybe it’s just that he’s not too discriminating about the roles he chooses, but I was genuinely happy to see him.  That being said, I’m not too sure why because it’s not like he’s some sort of motion picture arbiter of quality (though he was in Breaking Bad, which was all sorts of awesome).

Though in this instance it’s his screw-up that sets events in motion (by not breaking for a deer).

By the way, under most conditions when deer are hit by vehicles they don’t explode like they’d swallowed a hand grenade or something.

Another surprise is that Chris Bender and JC Spink are listed as producers.  They’ve done some pretty interesting work, such as The Butterfly EffectFinal Destination and The Ruins, among many others).

Which still doesn’t mean that Zombeavers isn’t going to suck, though at least there’s a (admittedly slim) chance it won’t (And apropos of nothing, the origin of the zombified beavers is remarkably similar to that of Marvel’s Daredevil, also on Netflix. Coincidence?  Probably).

About midway the movie turns to ‘The Raft,’ from Creepshow 2, except dumber, which shouldn’t be a surprise considering that earlier, when three sunbathing women encounter a bear–the one who happened to be topless covered her breasts, as if the bear somehow cared how small they were.

It’s worth mentioning that the beavers were brought to life–so to speak–via animatronics and hand puppetry, which I appreciate.

There’s also little in the way to CGI to be found, which is good because it would have made the movie look cheaper than it probably was.

Zombeavers plays like a parody of horror movies in which a bunch of–in this instance sort-of-young–young people find themselves in a horrific  situation, which would be fine if it were as funny as the situation is absurd.

So when all is said and done, not even Bill Burr can save Zombeavers, though the theme song at the end comes awfully close.

Zombeavers aren’t resting easy on Netflix.

Carrie (2013) – Review

“Kimberly Peirce’s Carrie, As Far As Remaks Goes, Isn’t Terribly Necessary, Though It’s Worth Seeing Anyway.”

For the longest time I’ve avoided watching Kimberly Peirce‘s remake of Brian DePalma’s Carrie because I just didn’t see the point, especially since from what I had seen from the trailers it wasn’t saying anything that the original didn’t.

And for the most part, I was right–and also wrong.

I’ll explain what I mean.  Pierce’s remake modernizes the material in a way that you’ll never get from DePalma’s movie–for instance characters use cell phones as well as the Internet–but there’s a very good reason for that:  Cell phones didn’t exist and I suspect that Internet didn’t either, at least not in the form that we know it today.

It’s also worth mentioning that the original movie might feel almost quaint (and to be honest, a bit dated) to a contemporary audience that’s grown up in the age of touch screen phones and the wireless interlinking of devices.

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Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials – Trailer

I haven’t read any of the books that The Maze Runner was based on, but I really, really disliked the movie.  Maybe it would have went over better if I had, but should you have to read the book to make sense of the movie?

(The answer is: Of course not!)

The setup behind the entire enterprise was so convoluted, so needlessly elaborate that I found myself laughing at some pretty odd moments.

Which is a good thing if you’re talking about a comedy, not so good if you’re talking about a drama and the scenes in question happen to be deadly serious.

With Aidan Gillen (Game of Thrones, The Wire) joining the cast it should add a significant shot of gravitas, though is that really what the series needs?

Even more than just a cleaner, more logical screenplay?

Steve Jobs – Teaser Trailer

When the news came out that David Fincher was no longer directing the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic, and that Danny Boyle was, people on various forums were complaining about what a terrible choice that was (especially compared to Fincher).

I wasn’t amongst them because I have always thought that Boyle was a very talented director.  Everything he’s done may not be perfect–then again, what director, acclaimed or otherwise, has ever reached such a lofty goal?–but most of it is undeniably interesting.

As is the casting of Michael Fassbender, in that he looks nothing like Jobs; though judging from what you can see here, his mannerisms and speech are very evocative of Apple’s famously mercurial leader.

It looks like it could be a winner; though I wonder if Aaron Sorkin’s script was authorized by Apple or the Jobs estate?  I haven’t heard any protests from either, so I assume so.

REC 4: Apocalypse – Review

“Ignore the naysayers.  REC 4: Apocalypse is a pretty good time.”

I’ve been particularly interested in the REC movies, because they’re quite possibly one of the most successful–in terms of staying faithful and uncompromisingly with what made them so interesting in the first place–horror series ever made (Unlike others, such as the Resident Evil series, which pretty much collapses after the first entry).

Each movie in the REC series builds on the one proceeding it, upping the ante in terms of horror, though the series veered slightly from the orignal formula with REC 3: Genesis, which puts forward that the source of the zombie infection was of a more supernatural nature.

REC 3: Genesis

I didn’t mind though, because there was nothing that invalidated what came before, yet it presented a novel perspective.

My expectations were pretty high in reference to the forth film in the series, REC 4: Apocalypse, though I few months ago I read a review that panned it.

So when it turned up on Netflix, I wasn’t expecting much; though I was pleasantly surprised because it was pretty entertaining.

REC 2

The fourth film in the series isn’t as innovative or as gory as the prior entries–and there’s way too much shaky-cam at a few crucial points–but overall it was well-acted and enjoyable.

This time the action takes place aboard a ship, in an effort to isolate the survivors of the last movie, as well as to find a cure.

The film, to varying degrees, sticks with the same found-footage format of the prior films, but used it sparing; though when it does it’s in a more logical fashion (in other words, the bulk of the movie unfolds conventionally, which is a good thing).

REC

When all is said and done, REC 4: Apocalypse is pretty satisfying way to spend an hour and a half, which is really what it’s all about.

REC 4: Apocalypse is currently infecting Netflix.

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow – Trailer

I haven’t been a fan of DC Comics-based series like Arrow (too soapy) or Gotham (too pre-Batman) but I have to admit that I like this trailer for DC’s Legends of Tomorrow.

It’s the adventures of the Atom, Rip Hunter, HawkwomanFlash, Captain Cold and Heatwave though what I like most is that it feels like it’s fully buying into the fantastical, comic book  origins of the characters, which is cool–and since The Flash, it seems that DC is bucking that trend toward “realism,” on television at any rate.