‘The Possession Of Michael King’ Trailer

This trailer really had me going for awhile.  As I have written before, I think stories of ghosts, gods and demons are little more than ways to explain where the sun goes at night, why there’s thunder during a storm or what makes you sick.  

And that’s all well and good, but the thing is, I also think that these stories, these myths are an interpretation of someone’s truth.  

In other words, I think that you shouldn’t tempt fate because the universe is far vaster and more strange than anything that I can even understand.

It’s also worth remembering that, for example, a crocodile doesn’t particularly care whether or not you believe in it, if the opportunity presents itself, it will devour you just the same.

And then the little girl says, “The monster, it’s you, Daddy.” and almost ruins everything that came before it.

‘Underworld’ Rebooted!

The Hollywood Reporter has reported that Underworld is being rebooted.  It’s been eight years since first entry in the trilogy (and two since the last film, Underworld Awakening).

And while I don’t necessarily think that eight years is a long time between reboots, at least it’s more than between the transition from Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3 to Marc Webb’s The Amazing Spider-Man.  

The thing is, a reboot of Underworld is not a bad thing, especially since the original films were little more than (visually speaking) Matrix knockoffs with vaguely supernatural overtones.  

This time around I hope that filmmakers spend less time finding out ways to better arm werewolves and vampires than to have them rely on their ‘natural’ abilities and leave the weaponry to humans, who need the assist.  

I also hope that the new movies are more on the horror side, as opposed to (somewhat generic) action films.

It’s not like there’s anything wrong with action films, though we could always use more horror films featuring werewolves and vampires.

 

‘The Pyramid’ Trailer

The found footage horror movie, The Pyramid, makes a point of mentioning that it’s produced by Alexandre Aja, the director of the reboot of The Hills Have Eyes (possibly the most ‘wholesome’ horror film I have ever seen), Mirrors and High Tension, among others.  What it doesn’t tell you is that it’s directed by Grégory Lavasseur, who’s Aja’s writing partner.   

In other words, what’s being implied is that you’ll somehow find the movie terrifying because of the influence of Aja, though looking at the trailer, I am not at all certain.

And while I think it’s just a coincidence, the trailer seems quite similar to Legendary’s As Above, So Below (both apparently feature people spending time running in terror through subterranean caverns), which is probably not a good thing.

 

Why Marvel Needs To Take Its Time Jumping On The Female Superhero Movie Bandwagon

I have written on women superheroes in movies in the past, and thought that it was a topic worth revisiting, especially since some have decided that Marvel Studios somehow has a duty to make a feature with a female lead.

Which is nonsense, but don’t get me wrong, inclusiveness is a great thing. All of us need to be able to see ourselves in the various superhero universes out there because they serve to not only inspire us, but as a reminder that reminder that we’re part of something greater than ourselves.

But there’s one problem with that thesis: Hollywood is driven not by altruism, but by money. If superhero films featuring women were successful, I guarantee you that every studio would be making them.

And it’s not rocket science as to why such films aren’t more common, which is because they have, so far, been failures at the box office.

For a prime example why Marvel should take their time, let’s look to 2004, when Warner Bros released Catwoman.  It was a failure, earning $80 million on a $100 million budget. And truth be told that was $80 million more than the movie deserved (Though Halle Berry was so classy that she actually attended the 2005 Golden Raspberry Awards–also known as “The Razzies“–where Catwoman “won” in the Worse Picture category).

And the thing is, I don’t blame Pitof, who directed, or Berry’s performance in the title role (though the ‘tuna’ scene was a bit obvious and silly).

Heck, I don’t even blame Theresa RebeckMichael Ferris or John Brancato, who wrote it.

I blame whichever executives at Warner Bros who green-lit the project because alarm bells should have immediately gone off when it was learned that the main character, Patience Phillips (Berry) was ‘Catwoman’ in name only.  Her origins had very little to do with the comics that inspired her creation.  Now, I understand that executives may have wanted to go in a different direction after Catwoman made an appearance in Tim Burton’s Batman Returns–who portrayed the character as a bit too damaged–but to go so totally in the opposite direction tonally was a bit of an over-correction.

As if the Titanic, in a effort to miss a a small sheet of ice, ran smack-dab into the iceberg.

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‘Amityville: The Awakening’ Trailer

Let’s be clear.  The likelihood is that there is no “Amityville Horror.”  Or UFO’s.  Or ghosts, for that matter.  Now, that’s not to say that I don’t fervently wish that there were more out there than us–which is, frankly more than a little depressing–but until I see some evidence myself, I am not buying it.

The universe is huge, and the amounts of planets that can theoretically support life is large as well, so while I am not saying that there are not other beings somewhere looking at the stars, I don’t believe that they are flitting about in spacecraft, possessing a particular fondness for cattle exsanguination.

And anal probing.  Let’s not forget that.

I feel similarly about ghosts.  While there are many things beyond our understanding, the idea that a departed person would hang around to haunt someone is a bit silly.  Besides, if even one out of every million violent deaths resulted in some sort of supernatural occurrence, then America would be a very, very scary place to in.

 

 

‘When The Game Stands Tall’ Review

When The Game Stands Tall

When The Game Stands Tall Is An Enjoyable Movie, Despite Its Manipulativeness

Have you ever watched something, be it a movie or TV show, and knew you were being manipulated? And I don’t necessarily mean that in a bad way. All media—including news, much to my dismay—is designed to elicit a reaction from the persons viewing it.

Though what separates great filmmakers from the merely good is that those that we admire the most are fluent in the language of controlling reactions. 

Which means that, as a viewer you just roll with it, as opposed to feeling hoodwinked and cheated somehow.  

For instance, if you’ve seem Guardians of the Galaxy, there’s a scene involving Groot at the end of the movie that’s very cute, and designed to evoke certain feelings.

And it works, because you’re so into the movie that you barely notice that you’re being played.

In other words, Thomas Carter is a good director, but not a great one because When The Game Stands Tall, taken as a whole is for a lot of its running time blatantly obvious in its intentions.

Which isn’t to imply that the movie isn’t sometimes thrilling, inspirational, or even sublime, but only that it tries too hard, when it would have been better off chronicling what happened in a less partial fashion, and let viewers come to their own conclusions about everyone involved.

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In The Penumbra Of The Black Plague

I am not a huge video game player, and in fact I tend to enjoy watching other people playing more than doing so myself.  I buy games every once in awhile, particularly if I like the concept behind them, play for a few minutes, then lose interest.

Most of it has to do with my attention span, which for games can be particularly brief. I have always been more interested in the hype that surrounds a game than the game itself; so that when I finally own a game that I have been lusting for for months, if not years, it almost automatically loses what got me interested in the first place.

When Steam was relatively new I purchased six or seven games, two of them being Penumbra: Black Plague and Requiem.

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