Spring – Trailer

Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead‘s Spring is an apt trailer to post since just earlier this week I was writing about H.P. Lovecraft.

The movie revolves around (Lou Taylor Pucci) who meets Louise (Nadia Hilker) in Italy, and falls madly in love.  Sure, it’s weird that Evan can only see her at night, but what relationship doesn’t have its quirks?

Though if that were Louise’s only problem, Spring wouldn’t be much of a movie.  The added bit is that it seems that she…changes at certain times to something not quite human.

It sounds like vintage Lovecraft, and until Guillermo Del Toro makes his At The Mountains Of Madness, I’ll take it though I get the feeling that Spring is not going to get a theatrical release.

Help Us, Guillermo Del Toro, You’re Our Only Hope!

And in case you don’t get the reference…

And you should know that I don’t take to paraphrasing Princess Leia lightly, though I think that it’s warranted in this particular case.

Call Girl Of Cthulhu trailer

The point being, I have just seen the trailer for Call Girl of Cthulhu and it looks to be in the vein of movies like Re-Animator and From Beyond, by which I mean the gory, gooey stuff is mixed with liberal doses of humor and/or camp, though I am not implying either of them aren’t entertaining and gory-good fun.

Though what they lack is a sense of the majestic, the feeling that they what we see on screen is only the tip of the iceberg and that the horrors out there in the vastness of space are way more horrific than we can even contemplate.  It’s present in Lovecraft’s writing–and especially in August Dereth’s–though no movie has dealt with the more cosmic aspects of his writing–though John Carpenter’s In The Mouth of Madness, has been the closest.

As far as the other movies go, there’s a certain tawdriness that’s not touched on in any of his writing that I have read–be they written by Lovecraft or not.

At The Moutains Of Madness 1

At The Mountains Of Madness 2

Two images of Guillermo Del Toro’s (so far) aborted film of H.P. Lovecraft’s At The Mountains of Madness

And that’s not to say that the sexiness that seems a part of Call Girl of Cthulhu isn’t present in someone’s writings, but I would at least like to see some of mysticism, the subtle horror evoked by his writings.

Which is why I plead to Guillermo del Toro to please bring At The Mountains Of Madness to the big screen because as far as I can tell no other filmmaker has the understanding of the Mythos, as well as the respect for its creator, to do it justice.

From what I have read of Del Toro’s take he intended to treat perhaps the seminal Lovecraft story with the piousness and gravitas that it deserves, and it’s about time.

The (Un)necessary Remake Dept: The Nun (La Monja)

The Nun movie posterLuis de la Madrid‘s 2005 ghost story The Nun (La Monja) isn’t a terrible movie by any stretch, though that’s not to imply that it’s particularly good, because it isn’t.

Though the greater crime is that there are stirrings of greatness not too far below the surface, which are never given a chance to bloom into horrific life.

First off, the movie shows its ghost with the most way too much, though I think I understand why.

Whenever the ghost appears it’s accompanied by an interesting visual effect: water flowing backward and in slow motion, filling the air like a curtain of light.  The problem is that, once you have seen the bogeyman, it–if not loses all power to frighten certainly suffers diminished potency–and you begin to see it for what it is, namely an interesting visual effect and little else.

Often, particularly in the case of horror films which by their very nature depend upon the suspension of belief, less is more.  If the film had–instead of showing their monster at seemingly every available opportunity–had instead showed some restraint, the movie would have benefitted immensely.

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Animal – Review

Animal movie poster

“”Animal” doesn’t break any new ground, but it is attractive to look at, and has some great pratical creature effects.”

Anyone who’s read this blog knows that I don’t particularly enjoy features from The Asylum.  For those unfamiliar with the company they produced movies like Sharknado, all those Mega Shark movies, as well as ZNation.

My problem isn’t that they are blatantly low-budget, it’s that they don’t seem to accept it–relying on cheap-looking digital elects way more often than they should–and also don’t seem to understand that using fewer special effects would work out better than lots of cheesy digital ones.

Most of their output turns up on the Syfy Channel, which isn’t a bad thing because I am not sure anyone else would want it.

Though Syfy isn’t the only channel that caters to genre-based entertainment.  There’s also Chiller, which is more focused on horror.  From what I have seen of their original productions–while they’re not Asylum bad–they’re generally pretty mediocre.

Then I saw Animal and have to admit that it was pretty good.  

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When Internet Memes Become Dangerous: Slenderman

I was reading Washington Post Express earlier today, when I saw a story that gave me pause:  Slenderman (as opposed to Slender Man) stabbing suspects ruled competent to stand trial.  Slenderman is fascinating because he’s one of the first–as far as I am aware–memes of the Internet Age to take on a life of its own.

What’s also pretty interesting is that this isn’t the fist time that such a being has “existed,” though before people were online urban legends were spread in the manner they were every since Man first appeared on the scene, which was among friends and acquaintances, be they gathered around a camp fire, or a bunch of rowdy kids roaming the concrete forests of Manhattan.

Spread from person to person, like some sort of virus, the stories–where sometimes a gem of truth existed among the more fantastical elements–were just a virulent as today’s Internet meme.

So, when I was growing up and exploring abandoned buildings in New York with my friends, we instead worried about terrors like Cropsey (which is actually really fascinating, with an mythos as elaborate, if not more so, than Slenderman) and Charlie Chop-off.

Though the first place that I ever heard of the Slenderman character was from Bloodydisgusting, where Adam Dodd (also known as Baby Colada) plays video games.

Though someone basing their crimes on a meme is a disturbing twist.

The (Un)necessary Remake Dept: Creature (1985)

Creature movie posterLet’s be clear:  William Malone’s (who also directed the very entertaining reboot of The House On Haunted Hill, among an extensive filmography) 1985 movie Creature is essentially a low-budget knock-off of Alien, down to the monster itself (when you could see it in its entirely that is, which wasn’t often).

It’s also not a very good movie, though by no means irredeemably so.

The premise involves two companies, the West German Richter Industries and the American NTI, which were working to profit from space exploration and exploiting whatever they happened to find.

The movie, despite taking place in the future, didn’t take into account the possibility of the fall of the Berlin Wall, which divided East from West Germany, five years later.

What it also doesn’t seem too cognizant of is the nature of corporations, which when they get large enough become almost stateless, borderless entities.

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Crimson Peak – Teaser Trailer

Crimson Peak - Creepy FigureLegendary Pictures can certainly use a hit, after the dismal performance of Black Hat and Seventh Son.  That being said, I hope that Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak is the movie that does it for them.

That being said, there are a few things riding against it.

First off, it’s rated R, which means that no one under 17 can see it without a parent or guardian, though that hasn’t stopped American Sniper from pulling in the bucks (though the only thing that the two movies are their rating and that they both have actors in them).

The movie looks gorgeous–it’s from del Toro, after all–though unlike his prior productions there appears to be overt sexuality, something only hinted at, if that, in his prior productions.