Marvel’s Daredevil – Teaser Trailer

When Jeph Loeb, head of Marvel Television, said that Marvel’s Daredevil would be a more street level interpretation of the character, he wasn’t kidding.  The trailer looks gritty and nothing at all like Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. or Marvel’s Agent Carter.

I think that it’s neat that so far every Marvel series each has its own distinctive look and feel.

The Town That Dreaded Sundown (2014) – Review

The Town That Dreaded Sundown movie poster

The Town That Dreaded Sundown (2014) Is Remarkably “Blah” And Pointless, Which Is A Pity Considering The Source Material”

While I was a bit dismayed when I first learned that one of the favorite horror films was being remade, I am even more put out to see it turn up on Netflix this evening (which implies that it wasn’t good enough to release in theaters because, while I am a huge fan of Netflix, movies that aren’t in some way associated with them don’t traditionally make it their first stop).

It’s already a bit too meta for my tastes and opens with a couple at a drive-in, watching the original The Town That Dreaded Sundown–someone even wears an eponymously-titled t-shirt, which is a bit like wearing a shirt with James Holmes‘ picture on the anniversary of the Colorado theater shootings.  Sure, you could do it, but it would also be in awfully bad taste–and with some people protesting that a movie based on a true event was being shown again.

And the thing is, you can see their point.

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Doug Stanhope: Miserablist Triumphant!

I don’t quite know why it is, but I find myself listening to a lot of Doug Stanhope lately.  I first heard of him from his concert, Beer Hall Putsch–available on Netflix–and from there I found a lot of his podcasts and concerts on Youtube.

He’s hilarious, though more importantly, he’s a comedian with an actual point of view.  You may not agree with a lot that he says–I know I don’t–but his observations are always interesting (and even enlightening sometimes).

Another thing is that, with many comedians, you can tell that while they may walk the walk, they don’t talk the talk.  In other words, their day-to-day lives have relatively little bearing on their comedy, except in an irritatingly observational way.

Not in the case of Stanhope, though I am not sure how much of what he says stems from a love of misery or if suffering only amplifies his humor, like sunlight through a magnifying glass.

He’s also done some commentaries for the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation), and all that I have seen are pretty hilarious.

His podcasts are also educational, after all, I didn’t know what the ‘Beer Hall Putsch’ referred to prior.  I also didn’t know that ‘miserablist’ was a real word (it is).

 

Beer Hall Putsch is on Netflix, and it’s definitely not meant for children.

John Carpenter’s “Halloween” Screening For Free (For A Limited Time Only)!

How limited, you might ask?  I have no idea, though according to The Daily Dead the free period began on the 16th, two days ago, so if you don’t already have in your collection, I’d take advantage of it before someone comes to their senses.

Besides, the last “horror” film I watched was Children Of The Corn: Urban Harvest, which was pretty funny, though the humor was unfortunately of the unintentional variety.

Unlike Halloween, which was one of the most influential horror films ever made.  What’s most interesting is that, despite how iconic the film may seem to viewers now, at the time Carpenter was making it he not only had any idea it would be as innovative as it ended up being, but its success almost defied logic.

Daredevil Premiere Date

Daredevil, The Man Without Fear

Daredevil, The Man Without Fear

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Daredevil (the first entry of Netflix’s launch of Marvel superheroes, soon to be followed by A.K.A. Jessica Jones, Luke Cage and Iron Fist, culminating in The Defenders) will premiere April 10.

And as typically the case with series that appear on Netflix, the entire first season will probably air in its entirety.

And I for one can’t wait.

 

The (Un)necessary Remake Dept: DeepStar Six

No, DeepStar Six, isn’t the latest Ultramarionation feature from Jamie Anderson, but a undersea horror movie from Sean Cunningham (Friday the 13th) that was followed in quick succession by George P. Cosmatos’ Leviathan, and culminated five months later in James Cameron’s far superior The Abyss.

DeepStar Six revolves around a US Navy mission to place an undersea missile sled on the ocean floor; an action that only makes sense when you take into account that the United States was approaching the end of the Cold War with the Soviet Union.

Dr. Van Gelder (Marius Weyers) is there to ensure that the missile platform is built before they leave the base, the time for which is rapidly approaching.

Unfortunately, the project is behind schedule, so he’s doesn’t have time to putter about.

The area where he choose to place the sled is suspected of having caverns underneath it, which Scarpelli (Nia Peoples) wants to take time to explore, though Dr. Gelder isn’t interested.  Sure, properly surveying the area could have saved them quite a bit of trouble, but what specialist worth their salt let’s safety concerns trump completing a project on time.

Which shouldn’t be a surprise considering one of their own crew, Snyder (Miguel Ferrer, who if James Spader was unavailable to play Ultron in the upcoming The Avengers: Age of Ultron, should have been on speed dial) is fraying at the seams and should have been evacuated to the surface weeks ago.

And speaking of Ferrer, he’s easily the most convincing character in the entire movie which is why it’s such a pity that he so explosively loses it toward the end.

Another awesome addition to the movie is someone whom you never see, but who’s presence is felt throughout the entire movie, and that’s the awesome score by Harry Manfredini (who’s theme for War Of The Worlds: The Second Invasion has to be one of the best television themes EVER.

Seriously.  It’s that good.

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‘Starship Troopers: Invasion’ Review

Starship Troopers: Invasion

“Dead Eyes And All, “Starship Troopers: Invasion” Takes The Series In A Great New Direction.”

“Starship Troopers,” Paul Verhoeven’s version of Robert Heinlein’s novel, has spawned three sequels, “Starship Troopers: Hero of the Federation,” “Starship Troopers: Marauder,” and Starship Troopers: Invasion” as well as an CGI-based series, “Roughnecks: The Starship Troopers Chronicles.”

It goes without saying that Verhoeven’s original remains unsurpassed, with the sequels being hobbled by humbler ambitions (probably) brought about by smaller budgets.

Though the last film, “Starship Troopers: Invasion” is a another matter.  It’s done entirely in CGI, like ‘Roughnecks, but racier in terms of language and nudity, probably to bring it in more in line with Verhoeven’s film.

Though there are places where it’s welcome, such as when used for rendering spaceships, armor and weaponry, which look as good as anything that appeared in the original. The ‘Bugs’ are also beneficiaries of the CGI largess as well, and they look great.

The humans…not so much.  They look like the producers had only two or three types of human figure, and used skin color, hair, body type and tattoos to differentiate them. The thing is, if you really look at people, you’ll notice that it’s the combination of little differences that combine to make us appear as individuals.

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