‘Deliver Us From Evil’ Review

Deliver Us From Evil movie poster

“There Is A Devil, Of This There Is No Doubt.  But Is He Trying To Get In, Or Trying To Get Out?”

One of of the worst horror films that I can recall was 1978’s Cruise Into Terror.  It’s been awhile, but I remember that it starred George Kennedy (going about things in his typically mildly-befuddled fashion) as the captain of a cruise ship.

The ship was also transporting a child-sized Egyptian sarcophagus for some reason.   It contained an evil entity, perhaps even Satan itself.  It never manifested physically, but it’s baneful influence was felt by everyone aboard the ship (kind of like Cthulhu-lite), till someone chucked it overboard.

Two things in particular stuck in my head:  The first was that, when the sarcophagus was sinking to the ocean floor, you clearly see that whatever was within it was breathing (by the sides of the sarcophagus pulsing).

It wasn’t an accident, but it was particularly dumb because a sarcophagus is essentially a very ornate coffin, so the body within isn’t resting directing against it, never mind being constructed in such a fashion that that just isn’t possible.

Though the important thing to remember is that there’s no way to tell if an occupant was breathing or not from the outside.

The other thing was that, when Satan was on its way to Davy Jones’ Locker, a woman said ominously in voiceover:  “There is a Devil, of this there’s no doubt.  But is he trying to get in, or trying to get out?”

And do you know what?  That simple line wedged itself in my teenaged mind, and in retrospect virtually redeemed everything about that damn waste of celluloid.

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No Crossovers: Why 20th Century Fox & Sony Need To Go It Alone

I understand why some fans of characters like the Fantastic Four, Wolverine, Spider-Man and The Avengers want to see all their favorite heroes on the screen at the same time.  Imagine the Avengers..avenging, when Spider-Man swings by or the X-Men encountering Iron man or Captain America?  It’s not impossible, though it is very unlikely because Iron Man and Captain America are owned by Marvel Studios, while Spider-Man is licensed to Sony/Columbia and the X-Men, which includes Wolverine, are licensed to 20th Century Fox.

As I said, I get it, though unlike some what I also understand is that there are even more reasons why it shouldn’t (any time soon, at any rate).

Let’s look at this on a studio-by-studio basis.

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‘Fury’ Trailer

What is it that calls actors to war (in movies that is, because I am reasonably sure few in the cast of David Ayer‘s Fury served in any conflict)?  John Wayne, who’s name was actually Marion, starred in quite a few war films, during World War II no less.

He didn’t serve in the military, though the reasons why are open to discussion or debate.

Fury is the second war film from Brad Pitt, Inglorious Basterds was the first, and I wonder what it is that motivates him, as well as other actors, to choose such roles.

Is it playing with big guns and tanks (the movie revolves around the crew of a tank in World War II)?  Is it the attraction of working with a director/writer who’s known for creating strong, compelling character (Whom are generally men.  Ayer doesn’t seem to invest much in women beyond their capacity to support men) pieces?

I have no idea, though it is interesting speculation.

What Separates A Successful Movie From One That Isn’t

Honestly, I have no clue.  Sure, I have ideas (and who doesn’t?) though you have to keep in mind that when I wrote that I thought that Robert Stromberg’s Maleficent was doomed to failure a few months ago that my reasoning was, for the most part, based on logic.  The “for the most part” is that I don’t think Angelina Jolie is a particularly good role model for young women.  Sure, she’s involved with all the right charities, but she also appears almost skeletal in pictures.

That’s not a good thing when, I assume, many of her fans are women of various ages, some of which happen to suffer from body-image issues.

And back on the logic side, there’s the fact that the production was troubled to such a degree that another director was brought in to help with reshoots.  And while that’s not necessarily a guarantee that a production is doomed, it’s not a good sign.  For example, the last time I recall it happening was when Oliver Hirshbiegel‘s 2007 movie The Invasion had reshoots done by the Wachowski’s.

And we all know how well that turned out.

More often than not, I don’t think much of movie studio executives.  From what I know of them, they appear to be a somewhat pampered, self-important lot that more often than not interfere more than they help any particular project.

In fact, if I were a studio executive and someone had brought me the screenplay–Hell, if Jolie handed it to me herself–I would have respected her enough to listen (though I don’t know how attentively) to the pitch before I wished her ‘Good day.’

And that’s even before a $180 million price tag would even had been mentioned.

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‘The Equalizer’ Trailer

This movie is going to be huge.  With The Transformers: Age Of Extinction and Guardians Of The Galaxy coming, The Equalizer probably isn’t on too many people’s radar, though it should be.

It’s based upon the 1985 CBS television series that starred the late Edward Woodward.  He played a private detective, and former intelligence agent, that specialized in cases defending people that had no other options, often against criminals that managed to evade the law.

In this current version Denzel Washington plays a former black-ops commando who wants out of that life, but finds himself picking up his guns (or a sledgehammer) to defend a young girl against Russian gangsters.

Despite a plot that sounds somewhat similar to 2004’s Man On Fire (or perhaps 2004’s Deathwish, hopefully minus all the rape). I expect this movie to reflect the action sensibilities of its director, Antoine Fuqua, who also directed Washington in the 2001’s Training Day, which earned Washington the Academy Award for Best Actor.

‘Think Like A Man Too’ Review

Think Like A Man Too movie poster

 

image courtesy of MovieWeb

image courtesy of MovieWeb

Tim Story is a prolific multihyphenate producer-director, who in the 12 years between 2002 to 2014, produced one feature and directed 10.

In 2011 he began a partnership with Kevin Hart, directing the standup specials Laugh At My Pain, followed by Let Me Explain (with Leslie Small) in 2013.

Between those two films he directed Think Like A Man, with an ensemble cast that included Hart.  It cost $12 million to produce, and earned just over $96 million dollars, which is virtually a license to print money.

In 2014 Story directed Ride Along, with Kevin Hart and Ice Cube.  I didn’t like it, partially because its plot was a rehash of Walter Hill’s Another 48 Hrs. (which was itself little more than a money grab, hoping to ride the coattails of the original 48 Hrs) though mainly because it wasn’t particularly funny.

Though I must be the only person who felt that way, because Ride Along earned over $153 million on a $25 million dollar budget, which was done almost entirely in the United States (only $19 million came from the foreign box office), which is the reverse of the way these sort of things work lately (movies like  The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Pacific Rim were stronger overseas than domestically).

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‘X-Men: Days Of Future Past’ Review

X-Men: Days of Future Past movie poster

SPOILERS ABOUND!  IF YOU HAVE NOT SEEN X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST GO AWAY TILL YOU HAVE BECAUSE SPOILERS ARE LIKE LANDMINES.  THEY’RE HIDDEN TILL YOU STUMBLE UPON THEM, THOUGH BY THAT TIME IT’S TOO LATE, AND SOMETHING IMPORTANT IS LOST.

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