‘The Avengers: Age Of Ultron’ Trailer

I have no idea how long this one is going to be live.  It’s supposed to be first shown during Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. but you know how the Interwebs are.  It’s pretty good visually–in fact, exceptionally so–but could be a bit sharper.

I’ll post the official release as well.

Check it out!

In case that one was pulled, here’s a more reliable link.

‘Top Five’ Trailer

Chris Rock’s Top Five was huge at the Toronto Film Festival, sparking a bidding war among studios like Lionsgate, CBS Films and Relativity, with Paramount coming out as the eventual victor.  Having seen the trailer, it looks interesting, but I am not quite what the supposedly frantic bidding was about.

‘Tomorrowland’ Trailer

I don’t know about Brad Bird’s Tomorrowland.  Maybe it’s because Damon Lindelof wrote it, and I still haven’t gotten over the silly “smoke monster” from Lost or the way he butchered Jon Spaihts’ original script for Prometheus (I know that it was his job was to remove the Alien-related references, and then stitch things back together again, but still).

If I stand removed from my own Lindelof-related issues for a moment, it looks okay.  Nothing earth shattering, but interesting because you might think that with Bird directing (The Incredibles) that it would somehow counterbalance other, aforementioned issues.

Nope.  Still leery.

‘Wolves’ Red Band Trailer

What it is about werewolf movies?  For every The HowlingAn American Werewolf In London or Dog Soldiers, you get twelve Skin Walkers and lots of crummy Howling sequels.

I don’t know know in which column David Hayter’s Wolves falls, but if the trailer is any indicator, lycantrophy is being used as a thinly-veiled allegory for a young man’s transition into adulthood.

And there’s nothing wrong with that, though it’s not exactly an uncommon theme as far as horror movies go.  That being said, plot and storyline are important, but a great looking werewolf transformation goes a long way toward, if not curing all ills at least making you forget about them for a little while.

Gerry Anderson’s ‘Firestorm’ On Kickstarter!

Gerry Anderson, the prolific British producer of shows like Space Precinct, UFO, Space: 1999, Terrahawks and Thunderbirds, died in 2012 but despite that fact he’s in a sense back with a new series, Firestorm, with the initial episodes being funded via Kickstarter.

As I said, Anderson embarked upon the greatest adventure two years ago, though before Alzheimer’s led to his eventual decline he sold his Firestorm concept (which he developed with John Needham, who also worked with him on Space Precinct and The New Adventures of Captain Scarlet) to a Japanese company, which created a CGI-enhanced cartoon based on the property.

Now Gerry Anderson’s son, Jamie, is running Anderson Entertainment and it appears that he’s acquired the rights to Firestorm, and he’s going back to the future, by which I mean he’s going to make the new series with puppets, models, practical special effects and cool ships (a hallmark of Anderson’s features).

So if you can send a little love his way–by which I mean a donation to the production via Kickstarter–do so because I get the feeling that this is going to be awesome.

Prelude To Axanar

I don’t traditionally like to link to full movies but Prelude To Axanar is something special, and this is coming from someone who isn’t a huge fan of the Star Trek universe (as far as the televised series’ are concerned,  I prefer Star Trek: Deep Space Nine most because Capt. Benjamin Sisko (Avery Brooks) wasn’t above engaging in realpolitik when the high-mindedness of The Federation didn’t do the job, which enabled him to essentially trick the Romulans into the Dominion War on The Federation’s side).

Prelude To Axanar started life as a Kickstarter and has already reached its funding goals, though they are still accepting contributions.  One purpose of the project is, I assume, as a  showcase for what the producers can do, and I have to admit that it’s impressive.

What I like is that is that it appears to be less about the personalities that actually fought in the conflict, than the conflict itself.  I like character development as much as the next person, but the producers decided–rightly in my view–it’s that such an important conflict in the Star Tek Universe that it would take precedence.

Besides, it stars Tony Todd,  Gary Graham and and Kate Vernon, who despite having seen recently playing Colonel Tigh’s wife on the Battlestar Galactica reboot, I didn’t recognize.

‘The Town That Dreaded Sundown’ Is On Netflix

I know that I have written on the reboot of the The Town That Dreaded Sundown before, but since the original has just turned up on Netflix, I though I’d throw something together.   If you’re into horror movies, it’s worth checking out because it’s a pretty good movie, though another reason is that if you intend to catch the upcoming reboot, it would be good to see the original first, for comparison’s sake.

What’s always creeped me out about it is that you see the killer quite a bit–though never his face.  It’s an acknowledgement that he moved around with a degree of impunity that only a person who was local, and by extension known to the community, could.

And as far as I am aware he was never caught, though for whatever reason the killings stopped.

The movie also has a narrator, which reminds me of the approach taken during certain parts of Tobe Hooper’s  The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.  It’s not a particularly gory movie, though the filmmakers do a good job of crafting the atmosphere of a small American town held tightly in the grip of fear.

Another thing that I enjoy about the movie is while a lot that you see on the screen is based on speculation, there’s no attempt to glorify or make him any scarier than he already is.