‘When The Game Stands Tall’ Review

When The Game Stands Tall

When The Game Stands Tall Is An Enjoyable Movie, Despite Its Manipulativeness

Have you ever watched something, be it a movie or TV show, and knew you were being manipulated? And I don’t necessarily mean that in a bad way. All media—including news, much to my dismay—is designed to elicit a reaction from the persons viewing it.

Though what separates great filmmakers from the merely good is that those that we admire the most are fluent in the language of controlling reactions. 

Which means that, as a viewer you just roll with it, as opposed to feeling hoodwinked and cheated somehow.  

For instance, if you’ve seem Guardians of the Galaxy, there’s a scene involving Groot at the end of the movie that’s very cute, and designed to evoke certain feelings.

And it works, because you’re so into the movie that you barely notice that you’re being played.

In other words, Thomas Carter is a good director, but not a great one because When The Game Stands Tall, taken as a whole is for a lot of its running time blatantly obvious in its intentions.

Which isn’t to imply that the movie isn’t sometimes thrilling, inspirational, or even sublime, but only that it tries too hard, when it would have been better off chronicling what happened in a less partial fashion, and let viewers come to their own conclusions about everyone involved.

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In The Penumbra Of The Black Plague

I am not a huge video game player, and in fact I tend to enjoy watching other people playing more than doing so myself.  I buy games every once in awhile, particularly if I like the concept behind them, play for a few minutes, then lose interest.

Most of it has to do with my attention span, which for games can be particularly brief. I have always been more interested in the hype that surrounds a game than the game itself; so that when I finally own a game that I have been lusting for for months, if not years, it almost automatically loses what got me interested in the first place.

When Steam was relatively new I purchased six or seven games, two of them being Penumbra: Black Plague and Requiem.

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‘Leprechaun: Origins’ Trailer

Unlike this trailer, I am not sure that I would ever call the character from the Leprechaun movies ‘iconic.’  

Sure, there were there were a few films based him, but he was never in the league of Freddy Krueger, Jason Voorhees or Michael Myers.

Anyway, this version looks a bit more serious (and significantly less campy) than prior entries in the series.  The producers were also wise to realize that this probably wouldn’t do well in theaters, which probably has a little to do with it being direct to video.

Click Bait: Paul Rudd Edition

First off, let me begin by saying that Paul Rudd is one of my favorite actors.  He reminds me a lot of Chris Pratt, minus the occasional athleticism and seemingly boundless optimism.

I mention him because recently a bunch of sites–such as Deadline: Hollywood, though I am sure there’re others–have featured pictures of Rudd from Marvel Studios’ upcoming Ant-Man and…

Is it Rudd in the Ant-Man costume?  Perhaps facing off against Yellowjacket? Something to get fans over the seemingly earth shattering debacle of Edgar Wright being replaced by Peyton Reed?

No, it’s Paul Rudd being…Paul Rudd.  How awfully lame.  And I get it.  It’s supposedly a picture from the Ant-Man set, but how can you tell?  It could literally be a picture of Paul Rudd wondering anywhere, who’s to know?

‘The Book Of Life’ Trailer 1 & 2

Guillermo del Toro, coming off the success of How To Train Your Dragon 2 (it’s earned over $535 million worldwide) has also produced the upcoming The Book of Life.  Judging from the trailer it looks like it could be fun but I have a few caveats:  First, it’s a cartoon that revolves around the Mexican Day of the Dead, yet there’s only one main actor–Diego Luna–who’s Spanish (Zoe Saldana doesn’t count.  She was born in New Jersey and and later, when she was 10, moved to the Dominican Republic with her family).

Looking at the credits on IMDB that’s actually not the case, but I hope they don’t end up window-dressing in a movie that’s about an aspect of their culture.

Dancing Groot

For the one or two of you that have seen James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy, this is the scene at the end (not the ‘button,’ or ‘stinger,’  only a tool would spoil that), and part of the reason why this is, so far, quite the most innovative Marvel movie of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU).

It’s such an odd, cute little scene, bursting with the love that screenwriters Gunn and Nicole Perlman clearly felt for the material.

See Warner Bros?  When you take something that under normal circumstances would be too treacly for words, and place it in the movie in a way that it serves a purpose and belongs, fans will get it.

 

‘Exodus: Gods And Kings’ Trailer

This is why I avoid “historical” movies.  First off, however Moses and Ramses looked, they weren’t white.  This is because white people (as in:  people that look like Christian Bale and Joel Edgerton) aren’t native to that region.

Now there were conquests made by Europeans, primarily Alexander the Great, but that was significantly after Moses would had been on the scene.

For instance, Egypt geographically neighbors Nubia.  The two countries were often in conflict–which is why some hieroglyphs contain figures that are darker-pigmented than others.

There was a period though, when Nubia conquered Egypt, and the Nubian rulers adopted the mores of Egypt, ruling that country for a period of time.

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