Steven DeKnight On ‘Daredevil’

I found this interview with Steven DeKnight, the showrunner for Netfilix’s upcoming series based on Marvel’s Daredevil, on Superherohype.  He actually give very little away, but does say that the series takes place in the 1970’s and that Vincent D’Onofrio is a really scary Kingpin.

He also mentions that things are going really well, though I suspect that he could be making the next Heaven’s Gate, and he would probably say the same thing.

The Last ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Trailer…

There may be more Guardians of the Galaxy trailers coming, but seeing that the movie is coming out in a bit less than two weeks, this is the last one (unless a new one has something more interesting to reveal) that I intend to post.  The reason being, as far as I am concerned they’re just preaching to the converted.

This trailer revolves around the coming together Peter Quill/Star Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket & Groot, the beings that will come to be known as the Guardians of the Galaxy.  They meet in the intergalactic prison known as the Kyln (an awesome name, by the way), though if the trailer is at all accurate, they won’t be there long.

The movie looks awesome and early reviews are positively glowing, so unless all of the sudden everything goes off the rails, I am expecting it to be pretty awesome.

I Know That Rocket Isn’t Hispanic, But…

In the TV Spot No. 17, from Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy you see a bit more of Groot and his relationship to Rocket.  Though what interested me most about the trailer is the way Rocket speaks.  He says: “Yes, you did, I just saw you do-ing it.  Why you ly-ing.”

And he sounds awfully ethnic, in fact, Hispanic.  Since Rocket is voiced by Bradley Cooper it’s seems unlikely that’s the feel he was going for; but don’t take my word for it, listen around the 0:04 mark.

It’s an odd bit of voice work.

‘Calvary’ Screening In Washington, DC

I enjoy horror and science fiction movies, primarily,  but they’re not the only type that I enjoy.  For instance, John Schlesinger’s Marathon Man, Sydney Pollack’s Three Days of the Condor, George Roy Hill’s Slap Shot and Robert Altman’s M.A.S.H are four films that I hold in particularly high esteem.

Which is primarily because they’re so different than what I typically view, which gives me a greater appreciation for them, as well as the movies that I watch more often.

Which is why I the last movie that I saw was Boyhood.  It’s not something that I would normally seek out, but was rewarding in its own way.

The same thing applies to John Michael McDonagh‘s Calvary.  I missed his last film, The Guard, so I want to make sure that I catch his latest.

And what better way than at an Advance Movie Screening!

‘Boyhood’ Review

Boyhood

 

Boyhood Is A Fascinating Movie More Because Of How It Was Made, Than The Movie Itself

I just saw Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, and it was pretty interesting, though mostly on the technical level (it was filmed over a period of 12 years); as an exercise in innovative filmmaking.  As a movie meant to engage an audience, it’s way too long–clocking in at almost three hours–and also curiously mistitled because for a movie named ‘Boyhood’ it deals very superficially with the ‘boy,’ of the title, Mason (Ellar Coltrane).

Traditional movies, when you see a young person age any length of time they’re typically played by a younger actor; so to see an actor literally age in front of you is pretty remarkable.

The problem is that Linklater doesn’t do anything–beyond the obvious–with his innovative idea.  Mason and his family go through ups, as well as downs (exemplified mostly by Mason’s mom, Patricia Arquette, and her serial marriages).

The actors all do their jobs well, though Ethan Hawke is particularly welcome as Mason’s father.  The thing is, if you take away the fascinating way that the movie was made, I honestly think Boyhood would be a pretty ordinary drama because when you get down to it the concept–watching a character literally age before our eyes–is the most interesting thing that it has going for it.

Though once you get used to that, which for me happened sometime around the 2 hour mark, when I began to get a bit antsy, and things got a bit less interesting.

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‘Horns’ Teaser Trailer

I don’t get this movie.  There’s a small town, heinous crimes involving young women and someone played by Daniel Radcliffe growing horns.  Horns was written by Joe Hill, who happens to be the son of Stephen King.  He’s probably not as prolific as his dad (which means that he’ll produce a full-length novel only every other week).

What’s in the movie’s favor is that it was directed by Alexandre Aja, who did High Tension, the reboot of The Hills Have Eyes (awesome movie, for my money the most wholesome horror film I have ever seen.  I’d make it mandatory family viewing) and Mirrors.