Bright – Teaser Trailer

Davis Ayer’s Bright is a fascinating movie for numerous reasons.  The first being that it was directed by Ayer himself, off the box office success of Suicide Squad.  Next is that it was written by Max Landis, son of John Landis and a in-demand writer.

Though what’s most interesting is that it’s being financed to the tune of $90 million by Netflix, and will be seen no where else (as far as I am aware) but there. And while I know that they get their money not from box office receipts, but subscribers $90 is a lot of moolah and as far as I know, their most expensive production to date.

Alien: Covenant Movie Clip – Prologue: Last Supper – Trailer

I really, really like this recently released clip from Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant because it seems–with good reason–to assume that most viewers are already familiar with the xenomorphs and instead spends its time developing the human characters. 

And there’s more character development in the just over four minute scene than in some entire movies, which is pleasing. 

And the ‘shout-out’ to Scott’s original–which starts around 2:47–is a lot of fun and pretty cheeky.  

Though what’s not so pleasant to me is the appearance of James Franco, that felt a little bit out of place for me.

And I readily admit that I have no particularly valid reason why I feel that way. 


Alien: Covenant Red Band Trailer

Raising Hell(boy)

When I read yesterday that the kibosh had been put on Hellboy III by none other than Guillermo Del Toro himself, I have to admit that I was a bit put out.

And what his account lacks in detail, it more than made up for in finality. 

As I said, I was a bit bothered, till I gave it some thought. The first Hellboy premiered in 2004, and like most projects Del Toro tackled, the love he felt for the subject matter saturated every frame.

The sequel, Hellboy II: The Golden Army came four years later, and managed to build on what was introduced in the first movie, while at the same time expanding on the world of the  B.P.R.D (the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Defense).

And as usual, it was a beautiful movie.  Del Toro was one of the first directors I can recall who used color to saturate a scene and I am confident in saying no one does so with more  assurance than he (the Underworld movies attempted a similar technique, but appeared heavy-handed compared to Del Toro’s use of the technique). 

So would I like to see another Hellboy movie?  Sure, especially since they managed to be unlike anything else produced at the time though as far as I am concerned, Del Toro (in movies) was Hellboy’s heart and soul and if he’s ready to turn the last page of this particular comic, then I am too.   

2017 Remake Of ‘The Usual Suspects’

I find Bryan Singer’s The Usual Suspects an irritating movie mainly because it’s not really as smart or as clever as it like to think that it is. 

Which is probably why I’m surprised to find that I really enjoyed this trailer from the sequel.

And Stephen Colbert in the role made famous by Kevin Spacey?  Genius. 

Ben Affleck No Longer Directing ‘The Batman’

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Ben Affleck will no longer be directing the tentatively titled The Batman for Warner Bros, though he still intends to star (and probably write with Geoff Johns) the upcoming feature. 

Part of me wonders if Affleck’s change of heart has anything to do with his latest feature, Live By Night tanking at the box office, and costing the studio somewhere in the ballpark of $75 million. 

Maybe? Maybe not?  Only time will tell though if for the reasons Affleck sites in the article–that as the director and the star that he perhaps couldn’t deliver the quality fans expect–is good enough reason for him to step aside.  

CHiPS – Official Trailer #1

Apparently Erik Estrada (who played Officer Frank Poncherello in the 1977 series CHiPs, which stands for California Highway Patrol) is none too happy about Dax Shepard‘s reinterpretation of the show he co-headlined with Larry Wilcox.

The truth of it is that I have no idea if Estrada has even seen the movie–though he mentioned about the highway patrolmen being involved in gunplay, none of which can be seen in the trailer, which at least raises the possibility that he has–though what surprises me about the trailer is not gun violence, but the blatant homoeroticism.  

Which, if you’ve seen Shepard in Bob Odenkirk’s Let’s Go To Prison, probably wouldn’t be that much of a shocker though when you take into account that the original series barely even hinted that the two officers had a sex life, never mind flirting with homosexuality (which seems to be done primarily for laughs, and is certainly going to piss off more than a few people if the scenes in the trailer make their way into the movie) then I could understand see Erik Estrada’s complaint a bit better.

Though considering that Archie is being interpreted as dark and edgy in the new CW series, Riverdale, I am not sure I see what the fuss is all about. 

Get Out – Trailer

I admit to being influenced by reviews a bit more than perhaps should in that if someome has a terrible time watching this or that, while it by no means guarantees that I won’t see it, though it does make it much more likely. 

For instance. I was genuinely curious about The Bye Bye Man, till I watched the guys over at Half In The Bag review/mock it. 

Now, not so interested (in my defense, it sounds really, really bad). 

Seeing that there aren’t a ton of horror movies coming out, I was thinking that maybe beggars can’t be choosers till I learned Jordan Peele has written and directed Get Out for Blunhouse Pictures, and it’s getting some pretty decent press so far.

Though there are some huge caveats, the main one being that David Ehrlich’s review–while by no means negative–isn’t exactly what I’d call positive, in that it spends so much time dealing with the racial aspects of Poole’s movie that it doesn’t properly address the huge elephant in the room, which is namely if Get Out is effective as a horror movie.

After all, that’s what it supposedly is, and all the praise in other areas–while commendable–sort of miss the point.