What About ‘Us?’

You might not be aware that but Jordan Peele, the director of the breakout hit Get Out, is preparing it’s follow up, Us, also for Blumhouse.

It’s also a horror movie–or perhaps should I say ‘social thriller’–starring Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke (both most recently seen in Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War)

What the movie is about specifically is anyone’s guess, bit supposedly it’s in a similar vein to Get Out, which was a pretty interesting movie, but it was also–essentially–an extra-long episode of The Twilight Zone.

And I’m not being a fan of the term ‘social thriller’ because it’s essentially meaningless and can be applied to anything that addresses the human condition within the framework of a dramatic scenario.

For instance, The Monsters Are Due On Maple Street, from The Twilight Zone‘s first season is what I’d call an almost pitch-perfect example of a ‘social thriller,’ and covers all the bases (that it doesn’t–directly–deal with people of color is neither here nor there, since that’s not a defining characteristic).

Though what I’d also call it is a horror story, a term that deserves much more respect than it’s typically given.

[Youtube=https://youtu.be/UO73e7Y5wHY]

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A (Partial) Visual History of Iron Man Armor in the Movies

As a huge fan of the MCU’s Iron Man (the image below this text is from my collection) I had never heard of the Stan Lee Museum Popup, though luckily someone a bit more fortunate was able to attend past these pictures to me.

Below are replicas of various Iron Man armors from the films.

Mark IIron Man (2008)

Mark IIIron Man (2008)

Mark IIIIron Man (2008)

Mark VIIron Man 2 (2010)

Mark XLIIIron Man 3 (2013)

Mark XLIIIAvengers: Age Of Ultron (2015)

Mark XLVICaptain America: Civil War (2016)

Thodey’s armor, despite being based on Iron Man, is visually a different beast entirely with a more purposeful, military thrust more interested in form following function, making Stark’s suit gaudy by comparison.

War Machine

And while the statue’s based may say ‘The Avengers’  War Machine wasn’t in that movie (though he did appear in the Iron Man movies, Avengers: Age of Ultron and Avengers: Infinity War).

And I’m guessing this variant of his suit is either from Iron Man 2 or 3 (I thought it was bulkier in  Avengers: Age of Ultron and Infinity War.

The Grinch – Trailer #2 (or Why Dr. Seuss Should NEVER be Done in Live Action)

Remember Jim Carrey’s live action portrayal in Dr. Suess’s The Grinch That Stole Christmas (in case you don’t I’ve included the trailer.  You’re welcome)?

How The Grinch That Stole Christmas (2000)

If there were ever characters designed to be animated, it’s Dr. Seuss’ s because his drawings, when placed in a real life context, come off not only weird but off-putting–and to be honest vaguely sinister.

Which I’m reasonably certain wasn’t the original intent.

The Cat In The Hat (2003)

In GCI though, it just works.

And while I have not seen the movie, that dog looks like it’s trying to steal the movie out from under Benedict Cumberbatch’s Grinch.

The Grinch (2018)

Shazam-Not-Wow

We’ve finally–via Entertainment Weekly–got an officially-sanctioned image of Zachary Levi in his Shazam costume.

And while the costume itself looks fine–as much of the Internet noticed from not-so-officially sanctioned set photos–Levi doesn’t look so good in it.

The greatest problems is the (fake) muscularity of his chest and biceps and questions or proportionality. What we’ve ended up with is not at all proportional to Levi himself so it comes off as if he’s got some weird physical deformities (did I mention how wonky his thighs look compared to his ankles).

With actors like Chris Evans, Henry Cavil and Ben Affleck their suits seemed to better accent their actual builds, as opposed to just adding bulk.

It won’t by any means kill the movie, it’s not exactly the best of omens that something so relatively simple goes so blatantly wrong.

And to think, all they needed to do is hire Dwayne Johnson to play the character and is wouldn’t even be an issue.

A ‘Strange’ Case of Nonsense

A few days ago Kevin Feige confirmed that there would be a Doctor Strange sequel, which must have been a comfort to the people too clueless to not know better. The original movie earned almost $678 million–on a budget of $165 million–so if there weren’t a sequel it certainly wouldn’t be because it wasn’t profitable.Then let’s not forget that Scott Derrickson and C. Robert Cargill (director and co-writer) have both said numerous times on Twitter that they not only did they think that there’d be a sequel, but that they were looking to have Nightmare as the villain. And that’s on top of Strange’s great showing in Thor: Ragnarok and Avengers: Infinity War, making the character more popular than ever. And if that weren’t evidence enough consider that some of the actors that portray the foundation of the Marvel Cinematic Universe–Robert Downey Jr and Chris Evans in particular–will likely sacrifice themselves to stop Thanos in Avengers 4, which means they’ll need more heavy-hitters like Benedict Cumberbatch to replace them.As I implied earlier, fairly obvious.

Don’t Cry Little Sister, Marilyn Manson’s Remake Is Better Than You Think…

…though not quite as good as the original.

I realized two things when listening to Marilyn Manson’s cover of Gerald McMann’s ‘Cry Little Sister’ from the 2010 Joel Schumacher horror/homosexuality allegory The Lost Boys namely Manson sings a lot better than I gave him credit for.

His voice holds up really well. That being said, the song is trying too hard to be haunting/scary, something the original pulled off more effortlessly.

The second is while the remake is by no means terrible, it’s does feel a bit pointless, since it feels different than the original in ways that seem to shout ‘I’m different!’ as opposed to having any valid reasons to actually be different.

Hidden Message in the Title of the Spider-Man: Homecoming Sequel?

It’s been revealed by Kevin Feige, President of Marvel Studios, that the title of the Spider-Man: Homecoming sequel will be Spider-Man: Far From Home.

And I genuinely have a problem with that because one way I interpreted the title of the first movie was as a return of Spider-Man back to where he belongs (never mind that the more obvious meaning was that it literally revolved around the preparation for Peter Parker’s first Homecoming dance).

Now, it’s rumored that the sequel takes place during a class trip to Europe, making ‘Far From Home’ a fitting subtitle.

But let’s look a little deeper. Just as Spider-Man: Homecoming could be interpreted as the return of Spidey to the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) could Spider-Man: Far From Home be read as an end of Spider-Man in the MCU?

The nature of the deal between Marvel Studios and Sony has always been a temporary one, though there has always been a bit of uncertainty around when it ends exactly.

As far as I’m aware, Spider-Man is a part of the MCU through Avengers 4 and the Spider-Man sequel, which makes me wonder if the subtitle of the Spider-Man sequel is a cagey way of Feige saying that Spidey’s tour of duty in the MCU is at an end?