Bright – Official Trailer

David Ayer’s Bright is the ‘fast-talking cop teams up with Orc’ movie we didn’t know we needed.

Watching the trailer I’m shocked at how long it feels (I haven’t seen the movie, yet it feels like I already have).

I also get the impression that the movie is treating orcs as Ordinary People, except for being…well…orcs.

Max Landis apparently earned a few million to write this, yet I suspect all he did was replace aliens with supernatural beings because this sounds awfully like Alien Nation.

Polaroid – Official Trailer

When I went to catch Alien: Covenant last Sunday (review coming soon!) I saw a poster for a movie called Polaroid.

Polaroid cameras in general would be an interesting way for evil to spread after all there’s something mildly disturbing about watching an image appear–almost ghostlike–when there had prior been nothing.

One of the original trailers for Lars Klevberg’s short was released and it looks plenty atmospheric, though by no means unique.

And while this trailer isn’t for the remake, it will likely look very similar (despite the inevitable Americanization).

Hopefully what made the original short so acclaimed will not be lost.

It also genuinely surprises me that there haven’t been more movies revolving  around instant cameras like the Polaroid (though I think there was a Stephen King story based on the iconic camera called The Sun Dog).

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets – Final Trailer

The trailer for Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is almost impossibly gorgeous, but seeing that Besson’s was also the director of The Fifth Element that was never an aspect of his filmmaking I was concerned about.

Never having read the comic the movie is based upon, I will just have Besson’s writing to guide me through the movie, which concerns me somewhat.

It’s not that Besson is a terrible writer, it’s that he doesn’t typically bring the gravitas, or in some instances, the originality a story might require.

And then there’re the two leads. James DeHaan is a good actor, though he looks a bit ‘young’ in the trailer (this may have more to do with DeHaan being a relatively slight person in general, but nothing about his antics in the trailers inspires confidence to me).  Then there’s the seemingly perpetual scowl of disapproval worn by Cara Delevingne in EVERY trailer for the movie.

Maybe they have a Han Solo/Princess Leia–thing going on, or that what we’re seeing in the trailers reflects exactly the relationship between both characters in the comic, but if that’s the case then we’re in for a particularly unpleasant ride, because it’s really unappealing.

Shifting Reality: Book I of the ISF-Allion Series – Review

I have been know to review books here on Screenphiles, but it’s not something that I do on any sort of regular basis.

That being said, I just finished Patty Jansen‘s Shifting Reality, the Book I of the ISF-Allion Series and it was…okay.

The future world the novel depicts was an interesting one, though my biggest gripe is that the book, in an effort by the writer to craft what appears to be a viable future, can be very exposition-heavy.

At the end of the novel, in a section called ‘About the Setting’ Jansen explains that a ‘major disaster’ drove rural people into Jarkarta where the worker population was sourced.

What is never made quite clear is why they were sourced from that region (other than the writer being fascinated with Indonesia and it’s culture).

Another way the book would have been improved would be if more information was provided about the ISF–their origins and how they came to be–as well as Allion–which initially seems like a sinister conglomerate but ends up so much more.

Luckily Melati Rudiyanto, the main protagonist of the novel, is our eyes and ears into this fascinating futurescape because while the narrative may lag on occasion, she was interesting enough to keep me invested.

Overall Shifting Reality is a pretty good read (despite the occasional narrative lag), and worth seeking out.

I discovered Shifting Reality via The Humble Bundle, where you can pay what you like for eBooks that shift regularly in terms of genre, so this week it might be horror, though next week or could be hard Sci-Fi, and so on.

It – Teaser Trailer and Trailer 1

As far as I’m concerned–at least initially–the best horror is in the sizzle, not the steak.

Keep in mind that in Steven Spielberg’s Jaws for a good portion of the movie you never see the shark at all (for the most part a fortuitous accident.  The mechanical shark, known affectionately as Bruce, more often than not didn’t work as planned, forcing Spielberg  to improvise).

Ridley Scott’s Alien followed a similar template, where the monster was gradually teased, making its reveal all the more terrifying.

The first version of Stephen King’s IT did a similar thing, doling out hints and glimpses of the evil clown, Pennywise, before the final reveal.

And Tim Curry’s Pennywise was terrifying, though why he was so unnerving is important.

First off, clowns are slightly creepy in and of themselves.  It doesn’t take all that much to make one look just a bit off…

And I suspect Tim Curry knew this. Visually his Pennywise looked like any ordinary clown, but the way Curry’s voice sounded combined with the way he carried himself made Pennywise oddly disturbing.

This new version of Pennywise looks as if they’re trying too hard to be Scary, and it doesn’t particularly work.  As I mentioned earlier, Tim Curry’s version wasn’t necessarily trying to look scary.  In fact, he looked like a clown that you’d see on just about any circus in the country.


But what the makers of is rebooted series don’t seem to understand is that having one oversized shoe in the normal world, and the other in the bizarre, is what’s terrifying.

This new version, as far as I can tell, tries way too hard.

Bright – Teaser Trailer

Davis Ayer’s Bright is a fascinating movie for numerous reasons.  The first being that it was directed by Ayer himself, off the box office success of Suicide Squad.  Next is that it was written by Max Landis, son of John Landis and a in-demand writer.

Though what’s most interesting is that it’s being financed to the tune of $90 million by Netflix, and will be seen no where else (as far as I am aware) but there. And while I know that they get their money not from box office receipts, but subscribers $90 is a lot of moolah and as far as I know, their most expensive production to date.

Alien: Covenant Movie Clip – Prologue: Last Supper – Trailer

I really, really like this recently released clip from Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant because it seems–with good reason–to assume that most viewers are already familiar with the xenomorphs and instead spends its time developing the human characters. 

And there’s more character development in the just over four minute scene than in some entire movies, which is pleasing. 

And the ‘shout-out’ to Scott’s original–which starts around 2:47–is a lot of fun and pretty cheeky.  

Though what’s not so pleasant to me is the appearance of James Franco, that felt a little bit out of place for me.

And I readily admit that I have no particularly valid reason why I feel that way. 


Alien: Covenant Red Band Trailer