Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom – Final Trailer 

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This is really weird.

Here’s the final trailer for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

And here’s the first trailer for the same movie:

Have you noticed that if it weren’t for the same cast and dinosaurs that they play like trailers for entirely different movies?

And that’s because the final trailer gives away plot points perhaps better never revealed outside the movie

And speaking of the final trailer, it plays like The Lost World: Jurassic Park, except on a larger scale and adding the element of militarized dinosaurs, while the first puts the destruction of Jurassic Park as it’s primary focus.

As I mentioned earlier, the new trailer unnecessarily gives away entirely new plot points unseen in any prior trailer.

I don’t know how people will respond to it, but it feels like a bit of a cock-up from where I sit.

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Marvel’s Jessica Jones Renewed for Season Three!

img_0069For those of you have seen Season Two of Netflix’s Jessica Jones you might have wondered the same thing I did, namely was it the last for Marvel’s acerbic, misanthropic super-powered detective as it tied up a lot of loose ends introduced in Season One.

Apparently, my fears–while not groundless–have proven to be unfounded as Netflix has renewed the series for a third season!

This makes me happy because it shows that–like Jessica Jones herself–the series is taking steps to move beyond the trauma that drove and defined her and it for two seasons, and trying to bring her to a place where she’s better able to face up to her demons (and who knows, maybe even acquire a bit of empathy toward others in the process).

As you might have guessed, I have no idea how the upcoming will go, though I certainly think the journey should be interesting.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline – Review 

While you can get away with calling Day of the Dead: Bloodline a ‘reimagining’ of George Romero’s classic, there’s nothing ‘bold’ about it (in fact, it’s such a loose interpretation that ‘Generic Zombie Thriller’ would work just as well).

Part of what made Romero’s movies so horrific (in the best possible way) was his penchant for slow-moving zombies.

Their speed was irrelevant because they’re so numerous.  They were a creeping horde of inevitability focused entirely on devouring anything living in their path.

It was this inexorable march that made them so terrifying;  no matter how fast you run, no matter how far you go, they’ll eventually catch up to you.

The zombies in ‘Bloodline’ are of the more athletic variety, which may create more immediate gratification in terms of (jump) scares, though the sense of inevitability, of tension, is lessened (If not lost entirely).

Another trait of a Romero zombie movie is what I like to think of as layered storytelling (a tendency that’s effective the less you see if it.  In his later movies he tended to hit you over then head with ‘MEANING!’ and ‘MESSAGE!!’ which made the movie that encased it a lot less interesting)

For instance, you can enjoy Romero’s Dawn of the Dead at face value–as simply a story of humans in a shopping mall facing off against the undead–or as a commentary on consumerism and how our need for stuff is literally devouring us.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline though?  What you see is literally what you get.  There’s nothing in the way of subtext, which isn’t a deal breaker if the action were more engaging or the characterization strong.

Neither of which, for the most part, happens to be the case.  Though the most damning criticism of the movie is that too many characters have more to worry about from catching ‘the stupids’ than a zombie virus.

By which I mean there’re  too many scenes where people die in circumstances where someone with an iota of common sense wouldn’t. If it happens one time you chalk it up to bad luck.

If it happens three or four more times, it’s really bad writing.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline is not by any means a terrible movie, just not particularly noteworthy.

Cargo – Trailer

CargoIt appears that the zombie genre has greater legs than anyone might have anticipated  (AMC’s The Walking Dead–despite a ratings decline–still shuffles on while spawning a sequel–Fear The Walking Dead–a somewhat unnecessary admonition) and along the way appears to have discovered a legitimacy few horror genres have had prior.

Though that shouldn’t be a surprise in that George Romero has long used the zombie genre to tell tales of class warfare and as metaphors for consumerism, among other things.

The latest example: Cargo, starring Morgan Freeman (Sherlock, Black Panther) which is coming on Netflix (Yay!) May 18.

What–if the trailer is to be believed–separates Cargo from it’s grisly siblings is that Freeman’s character appears to be be infected himself (and in search of a cure among the Aboriginal people of Australia) while the baby he carries (likely the ‘cargo’ of the title)–isn’t.

 

The Roar Heard Around The World

Screenshot 2018-02-15 02.43.15Marvel Studios’ Black Panther is a bit of an anomaly less because it was written by two African-Americans, Ryan Coogler and Joe Ryan Cole, with a primarily African-American cast than taking those things into account the movie has been gifted a relatively large budget–for a Marvel Studios feature–of $200 million.

And that’s pretty convincing sign of Kevin Feige’s faith in the production, which has been borne out by the box office.

Domestically the movie has (so far) earned $235 million, while pulling in $169 million in international receipts, for a total or $404 million.

It should go without saying that’s pretty amazing opening, increasing the likelihood that this movie joins the Billion Dollar Club before its run is complete.

Next Black Panther will be released in Russia, Trinidad, Peru, Venezuela, Japan and China.

Unsane – Official Trailer

Screenshot 2018-01-29 14.09.45Unsane is a thriller from Steven Soderbergh that was apparently shot entirely on an iPhone.

Looking at the trailer, you can tell (it doesn’t look particularly cinematic, especially in wide shots, where you can see some lens distortion) it wasn’t shot on video cameras at any rate.

The lighting is a bit atypical as well, though I think that that is due to the iPhone light sensor, and it’s inability to deal with variations in light and shadow in a nuanced fashion.

Story-wise, I don’t buy it.  If someone commits themselves, as far as I am aware, it’s not the same as when the state commits them, in that they have the right to come and go as they please.

Then again, I only know that from movies, so who knows it it’s actually true or not.

Pacific Rim: Uprising – Official Trailer #2

It might just be me, but the latest trailer for Steven DeKnight’s Pacific Rim: Uprising feels very…YA-ish.

And in and of itself that’s not necessarily a bad thing (and God forbid it appeared exactly the same as the first movie.  I’d likely be whinging about that).

But it definitely feels different, anyway.

And one other thing…there’s a reason many of the Jaeger vs Kaiju battles in the first movie played out either at night or in the rain (and sometimes both!).  It’s easier to make CGI and green screen seem more realistic if it’s not quite so clearly delineated (which is kinder way of saying that the scenes set in a city in Uprising set during the day look particularly videogamey in a way the first movie did not).