Polaroid – Trailer

Always jonsing for a new horror movie, the trailer for Lars Klevberg’s Polaroid turned up a few days ago, and it looks pretty much like it’s cribbing from virtually every horror movie from the the past ten years or so.

Which doesn’t that it won’t be an enjoyable–horror is known for its recycling ethos–but what it does mean is that visually (and more importantly, thematically) it sounds like A LOT of other movies.

Though what’s perhaps more interesting is that the movie comes from Dimension Films, who it could be argued created the ‘Blumhouse model’ before Blumhouse (though without that company’s singleminded dedication to the concept).

Here’s the trailer and as usual, let me know what you think.

Polaroid – Official Trailer

When I went to catch Alien: Covenant last Sunday (review coming soon!) I saw a poster for a movie called Polaroid.

Polaroid cameras in general would be an interesting way for evil to spread after all there’s something mildly disturbing about watching an image appear–almost ghostlike–when there had prior been nothing.

One of the original trailers for Lars Klevberg’s short was released and it looks plenty atmospheric, though by no means unique.

And while this trailer isn’t for the remake, it will likely look very similar (despite the inevitable Americanization).

Hopefully what made the original short so acclaimed will not be lost.

It also genuinely surprises me that there haven’t been more movies revolving  around instant cameras like the Polaroid (though I think there was a Stephen King story based on the iconic camera called The Sun Dog).

‘Guardians’’ Box Office Is Out Of This World!

Marvel Studios’s Guardians Of The Galaxy, Vol. 2 has–so far–earned over $425 million worldwide!  The likelihood is high that the it will surpass half a billion by this week, and will more than likely finish its theatrical run over a billion dollars.

It’s worth mentioning that the first movie at the end of its run earned a bit over $773 million, though the sequel is outperforming it handily both domestically and abroad.

Though with Alien: Covenant coming out in 10 days the xenomorphs are looking to to take a bite out Guardians’ box office aspirations, which truth be told is unlikely because Alien: Covenant is R-rated, while Guardians Of The Galaxy, Vol. 2 is PG-13, which means that not only are each geared to a different audience age-wise, but also viewer-wise.

Alien: Covenant will likely skew male, while Guardians Of The Galaxy, Vol. 2 will not only draw males, but a greater percentage of women, and children (the latter of which should not be watching the Alien movie at all).

Alien: Covenant | Prologue: The Crossing – Trailer

I find this latest trailer for Ridley Scott’s upcoming Alien: Covenant particularly fascinating, though not necessarily for the reasons that I originally thought I would.

I found the idea that Shaw (Noomi Rapace) had initially reassembled David (Michael Fassbinder) somewhat troubling, especially when you take into account the chaos that he had a hand in initiating–never mind the de-facto murder of Halloway (Logan Marshall-Green) though it’s not apparent that Shaw realizes that David was behind that.

Though it actually makes sense that she would repair David because the likelihood is great that she could not pilot the ship alone, and besides the idea of traveling to an Alien–literally and figuratively–with a talking, disembodied head would probably NOT be a great idea.

Besides, Shaw has journeyed light-years across space on the strength of her faith; on the chance that she might meet the people who literally engineered the Human species.

Compared to the wonders she’d seen, and the terrors she’s survived, repairing David is almost a no-brainer.

Though what’s most interesting about the trailer is toward the end, when the ship arrives in the Engineer homeworld and David says: ‘Look on my works, you Mighty, and despair!’

That’s a line from Perry Bysshe Shelly’s Ozymandias and while it’s uncertain how David means it, seeing that the poem revolves around a found remnant of a fallen empire, it doesn’t look good for the Engineers.

It – Teaser Trailer and Trailer 1

As far as I’m concerned–at least initially–the best horror is in the sizzle, not the steak.

Keep in mind that in Steven Spielberg’s Jaws for a good portion of the movie you never see the shark at all (for the most part a fortuitous accident.  The mechanical shark, known affectionately as Bruce, more often than not didn’t work as planned, forcing Spielberg  to improvise).

Ridley Scott’s Alien followed a similar template, where the monster was gradually teased, making its reveal all the more terrifying.

The first version of Stephen King’s IT did a similar thing, doling out hints and glimpses of the evil clown, Pennywise, before the final reveal.

And Tim Curry’s Pennywise was terrifying, though why he was so unnerving is important.

First off, clowns are slightly creepy in and of themselves.  It doesn’t take all that much to make one look just a bit off…

And I suspect Tim Curry knew this. Visually his Pennywise looked like any ordinary clown, but the way Curry’s voice sounded combined with the way he carried himself made Pennywise oddly disturbing.

This new version of Pennywise looks as if they’re trying too hard to be Scary, and it doesn’t particularly work.  As I mentioned earlier, Tim Curry’s version wasn’t necessarily trying to look scary.  In fact, he looked like a clown that you’d see on just about any circus in the country.


But what the makers of is rebooted series don’t seem to understand is that having one oversized shoe in the normal world, and the other in the bizarre, is what’s terrifying.

This new version, as far as I can tell, tries way too hard.

Alien: Covenant Movie Clip – Prologue: Last Supper – Trailer

I really, really like this recently released clip from Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant because it seems–with good reason–to assume that most viewers are already familiar with the xenomorphs and instead spends its time developing the human characters. 

And there’s more character development in the just over four minute scene than in some entire movies, which is pleasing. 

And the ‘shout-out’ to Scott’s original–which starts around 2:47–is a lot of fun and pretty cheeky.  

Though what’s not so pleasant to me is the appearance of James Franco, that felt a little bit out of place for me.

And I readily admit that I have no particularly valid reason why I feel that way. 


Alien: Covenant Red Band Trailer

XX – Official Trailer

XX, not to be confused with XXX: The Return of Zander Cage, is likely named after the female sex chromosome, an indicator this anthology (in this instance a movie composed of a series of shorts) will be directed by entirely by women.  

Though what I am most concerned about is if the movie will be consistently scary because anthologies are notoriously difficult to do well due to they’re only as strong as their weakest entry (one reason Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone is one of the best of the breed is that it originally aired on network television, an episode at a time.  This meant that strong stories weren’t shown directly before or after weaker ones, enabling viewers to judge them each on their own merits, as opposed to being directly compared against what aired only minutes before).  

And having the whole project based around the fact that the directors are women?  Not too sure that that’s a great idea because I would think that it’s only relevant if their sex informs what we’re seeing on screen in identifiable ways (who we are as individuals informs everything that we do, but in this particular instance the choice of female directors need to bring some sort of additional insight–for instance, I suspect Jennifer Kent’s The Babadook would be an entirely different movie in terms of its narrative thrust as well as its priorities, if it were directed by a man) that enhance what we’re seeing on screen. 

Though if nothing about the vignettes that make up XX brings the distinctiveness I spoke to earlier, then I am unsure that there’s a point.