Is Wonder Woman Really the Highest Earning Superhero Origin Movie?

'Wonder Woman' is highest-grossing superhero origin movie of all time - Business Insider copySorry, I don’t buy it Wonder Woman as the ‘highest-grossing superhero origin movie of all time.

Reason being, it neglect a little movie called Spider-Man: Homecoming.

Spider-Man isn’t an origin movie, you say?

That’s where we’ll have to differ (because it is).

This iteration of Spider-Man is first introduced in Captain America: Civil War so it technically isn’t his first appearance.  Then again, Wonder Woman was first introduced in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice so it wasn’t her’s either.

But what people who say Spider-Man: Homecoming isn’t an origin story seem to be missing is that there have been THREE prior versions of the character relatively recently, which means to include it again would bore moviegoers (The Amazing Spider-Man retconned the origin, making Peter Parker’s parents spies–sort of–which was  dumb, though you can at least understand why they did it).

So Marvel Studios took a different approach.  They emphasized Spider-Man growing in the role, so in a sense it is an origin film in that Parker–despite wearing the costume–is not Spider-Man.

Instead he’s awkward, and truth be told, not terribly good at what he does (a fact the movie emphasizes more often than once).

In other words, Spider-Man: Homecoming is an origin story, just not a blatantly obvious one.

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Business Insider Has Already Named Pixar’s The Good Dinosaur a Failure, Which Isn’t Quite True

According to Business Insider, Pixar’s The Good Dinosaur is the company’s first box office failure, though that’s not quite true (not yet, at any rate).

The reason being, the movie has only been out thirteen days, so it’s a bit too early to tell.  Ironically, the Variety article that the Business Insider article links to is closer to truth, which is namely that it’s underperforming, especially compared to past Pixar movies.

But that’s not the same as failure (despite the fact that some pretty huge movies, like Star Wars: The Force Awakens are preparing to suck all the oxygen out of the box office) though what it also isn’t is as dramatic a headline.

And that’s problematic because it’s not unusual for a person to not see a movie on the strength of whether or not they believe it’s going to be in the theaters in the next week or two.

Which is what makes what Business Insider did not so cool.

Sometimes When There’s Smoke, (There’s Someone Making Much Ado Out Of Nothing)

This morning, I decided to see how much Peter Jackson’s “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” cost to produce.  Box Office Mojo didn’t list its production costs, but with a modicum of searching I learned that the budget was probably around $250 million (most of which you can see on screen).

Now, my whining comes in after I read a story from Business Insider, a site I normally like quite a bit, which implies that Jackson’s film isn’t tracking on par with his ‘Rings’ films.  The article also implies that all is gloom and door as far as the two sequels are concerned (‘The Hobbit’ is the first in a trilogy).

This is beyond nonsense.  If only because it has already earned, worldwide, over $622 million dollars, and will probably be going strong well into the new year.  Now keep in mind, we’re talking a production budget of only (!) $250 million, so I fully expect that it will earn at least $700 million (and I am probably being conservative) before its theater run ends.

And that’s not including profits from DVD sales, streaming deals, and venues like iTunes.

Though admittedly an important part of this equation is that the each of the ‘Lord Of The Rings’ films squeaked in for under $200 million, which means that for the costs of almost the ENTIRE first three films you get–almost–one ‘Hobbit.”

Looking at the finished product, I think that it’s a bargain.  This latest film seems better assembled, more accomplished and significantly more fun than any of the prior three films.

And that has to count for something.