Advertisements

Sinister 2 – Review

Sinister 2 movie poster

“The ideas behind Sinister 2 are a lot scarier than the movie itself.”

What bothered me most about Ciarán Foy’s Sinister 2 is pretty much exactly what bothered me about Scott Derrickson’s original film, namely that it takes an interestingly horrific idea–children committing heinous crimes–and virtually undermines it by looking at it from the perspective of an adult.

There’s a scene (one of many), when Dylan Collins (Robert Daniel Sloan) is being coerced into watching homemade snuff films made by the children, now disembodied ghosts, that killed their families for the demon, Bughuul (he of the hideously silly name, played by Nicholas King).

There’s an interesting addition to the mythology that indicates that when Dylan finishes watching the ghosts’ home movies, he would be compelled to murder his family, before being taken by the demon.

One horrific murder happens during Christmas, when one of the children kills his family and put the bodies in four graves (which I assume weren’t pre-dug) and buries them up to their necks.

Visually, it was pretty effective, though logically made no sense at all.

They died in their home, yet a young boy supposedly not only dragged four people (one of them probably weighing somewhere in the ballpark of 180-200 pounds) out of their home one at a time (no other way he could do so), then dug graves deep enough that when they lied down horizontally they could be easily buried?

Remember that I mentioned earlier that this happened during Christmas?  The reason it’s worth bringing back up is because earth. like anything else, freezes when cold, which makes it really hard to break.

And a little kid not only dug one shallow grave, but four others?   Extremely unlikely.

These overly elaborate murder scenarios–there’s another aptly titled ‘Fishing Trip’–took me out of the movie virtually every time they turned up, because while they may look horrific, they didn’t make any practical sense.

The movie between the frankly ridiculous ritual murders was pretty effective as we witnessed the ghosts trying to sway Dylan to their will, though there are few things less scary than children trying to look scary, when happens a lot in this movie.

Quibbles aside, Sinister 2 is worth catching because it’s genuinely atmospheric and Foy’s direction is effective, though as a movie it’s merely interesting, when it could have been terrifying.

And I would advise that you leave the theater three or four minutes before the movie finishes because the ending is just too dumb for such a smart director like Ciarán Foy.

Sinister 2 – Trailer

The biggest problem with Scott Derrickson’s Sinister for me was that Bughuul (Bagul?) was sort of dopey, though considering that that mythical dream demon was the engine that powered the movie, that’s a pretty big hurdle to overcome.

If the trailer for Sinister 2 is any indication, it appears that director Ciarán Foy (Citadel) has tackled the issue of the inherent silliness of the character head-on.  His answer is to weave a feeling, an air, of mystery around the character, often by obscuring him in shadow, and making him move by way of quick edits.

From what I can see, it works.  There are moments in this trailer that make him appear genuinely creepy.

So far, so good.

Ciarán Foy Is Sinister 2

What I mean is that Ciarán Foy will be taking the reigns of the upcoming Sinister 2 from Scott Derrickson, who has his hands full preparing to helm Marvel Studios’ upcoming feature based on their Master of the Mystic Arts, Doctor Strange.

The only film I have seen of Foy’s is his 2012 film Citadel (which plays like a variation on David Cronenberg’s The Brood, minus the body horror)–which is also a horror film that unlike many of its contemporaries has a sense of bleakness, of hopelessness about it which is enhanced by a color palate so muted that it feels like a black and white movie.

If he can bring some of feel, the imagry that made Citadel so satisfying to Sinister 2, I think he’ll have a hit on his hands.

%d bloggers like this: