Casualties

I don’t think that I have ever seen a film that demands a remake more than this one (and I know that I have written that remakes/reboots are generally a bad idea, but this film is crying out for it)

“Casulties,” was made in 1997 by Alex Graves and revolves around Annie Summers (Caroline Goodall) and her husband, Bill (John Gries plays a person with serious anger issues, not something you traditionally see from the actor) a decorated police officer who also happens to find it difficult to keep his fists (though hitting her is mostly implied) off her.

Enter Tommy Nance (Mark Harmon) who she meets in her cooking class.  He’s pretty good at it, though he’s better at photography and killing people (which is a desirable trait for a hit man).  He almost immediately figures out that Annie is being beat by her husband, will eventually have him under surveillance, in an effort to determine his comings and goings.

He eventually tells her what he does – actually he does upon first meeting her, but who would believe such a thing –  and true to his word, goes about dispatching her husband.  She comes in during the act, and Tommy makes it so that all the clues point to her as the killer, and he spirits her out of there.

Annie is treated like royalty, and while I have no idea if he actually loves her – after all, he hasn’t known her that long – he does appear extremely devoted to her.

So suddenly, Annie gets the gumption to fight back, going so far as pushing Tommy down an elevator shaft, and attempted poisonings.

And I get that Tommy is hardly what one would call an ideal choice as a life partner – mainly because of all the killing.  That being said, he never hit her (till later in the movie, and her response would have done Rocky proud), AND appears to love the ground she walks on.

So why is she now, all of a sudden, after what I assume was years of beatings, so determined to get away from him?

My problem is not her actions in and of themselves, but that such strength, resolve and determination appear out of character.  After all, if she was always so resolute, I doubt that her husband would have been using her as a punching bag in the first place.  And if not, where did this newfound resolution and cleverness (you have to see how she kills Tommy at the end, which is not terribly necessary because if you hit anyone in the mouth with an iron pipe with even minimal force they’re probably not going to keep after you) come from, and why couldn’t it make a more timely appearance.

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