The Edge of Seventeen – Trailer

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I don’t tend to be a comedy guy–I enjoy them, but don’t tend to go out of my way to catch one–but the trailer for Kelly Fremon’s The Edge of Seventeen really caught my attention.

First off, it apparently recognizes that the best comedy comes from tragedy, so there’s a girl, Nadine Byrd (Hailee Steinfeld), who’s doing her best to navigate the waters of rapidly approaching adulthood.

This journey is made even more perilous by her brother, who’s confident where she’s timorous, popular where she’s a wallflower.

And if that weren’t bad enough, he’s fallen for her best friend.

And there’s Woody Harrelson, a guidance counselor (or favorite teacher.  You really can’t tell from the trailer) of Byrd’s who acts, at times, as an unwilling witness to her angst.

And by the way, Tom Cruise, The Edge of Seventeen is a great title for a movie of this type.

‘The Edge of…’ just about anything is a terrible title for a hard sci-fi feature (which doesn’t apply to the Star Trek episode, City on the Edge of Forever because it issued from the always fertile mind of Harlan Ellison).

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – Official Olympics Trailer

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Does the image to the left remind anyone else of the scene in Close Encounters of the Third Kind when the alien mothership hovers over Devil’s Tower?

That’s the first thing that came to mind when I saw this image from Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

The other thing was that, if I’m lucky, it might also be the first movie directed by Gareth Edwards that I think I might enjoy.

Monsters was underwhelming, and Edwards with Godzilla pulled of the seeming impossible: namely making a Godzilla movie that was dull.

Here’s to Rogue One making up for lost ground, directorially speaking at any rate.

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter – Official Trailer

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Remember when I did a writeup of the Resident Evil: The Final Chapter Teaser Trailer and all I did was complain about how much I dislike the series?

That hasn’t changed.

Though I find the first full trailer for the movie interesting because it contains various elements from the first movie, such as the laser trap…


and the Red Queen.

As I said earlier, the first movie is the only one in the series worth seeing.  If they’ve got Marilyn Manson back to do the soundtrack, it might be worth seeing.

Now that I think of it, I also don’t quite know how to classify the Resident Evil movies. The first I would call an action movie, though a very horror-adjacent one.

The other movies in the franchise? They’re all pretty much mediocre action films, with occasional horror elements.

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter – Teaser Trailer

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Did you know that George Romero (Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Creepshow, The Dark Half-one of the better adaptations of a Steven King story) was in contention to direct the first Resident Evil movie before Paul W.S. Anderson was chosen?

That the father of the modern day zombie movie somehow couldn’t approach a property that revolves around the walking dead to the satisfaction of Capcom (the creator of the Resident Evil video games) I find particularly interesting.

That being said, I haven’t  read Romero’s screenplay so I have no idea why it was rejected, though having seen virtually all the movies that make up the franchise, I have to wonder if some executive in Japan aren’t kicking themselves.

Or maybe committing seppuku if he hadn’t already (and yes, I’m reasonably sure that most , if not all, of Capcom’s executives are male).

Because, while the first movie is pretty decent, the latter certainly aren’t and in fact they get progressively worse as the series moves toward this, the the penultimate chapter.

Hacksaw Ridge – Trailer

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I love a good war flick, though preferably of the more–relatively speaking–modern variety, where the people doing the fighting believe that what they’re doing is for all the right reasons, till they often come to see whichever conflict they happen to be engaging in a context larger than themselves.

I think the first I can recall enjoying was Stanford Whitman’s Baby Blue Marine, starring Jan-Michael Vincent.

Followed by The Big Red One, Hamburger HillPlatoon and Full Metal Jacket.

While the four movies–by no means an exhaustive list–aren’t the only war films I’ve seen, they did make the strongest impression upon me.

So now comes Hacksaw Ridge, directed by Mel Gibson–which the trailer does everything in its power not to mention.

And I get it.  Gibson went off the rails a bit though to be fair I’d see a Mel Gibson movie over anything by Woody Allen or Roman Polanski (especially Polanski).

Besides, if there’s anything Mel Gibson has shown us it’s that he can direct, though if you look at some of those movies, like Apocalypto and The Passion of the Christ, it goes without saying that Hacksaw Ridge will likely not neglect the gorier aspects of combat.

The Great Wall – Trailer

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What is it with Matt Damon and comments and/or activities of a racially-dubious nature?

First there were the comments made during his and Ben Affleck’s HBO series–now cancelledProject Greenlight, where Damon finds diversity okay, as long as it’s in its place.

If I recall, that happened sometime last year (or earlier this year).

Now Damon is starring in The Great Wall, where he apparently acts as a savior of the Chinese people.

From the trailer the movie looks like a fantasy–which is fitting in ways the producers probably didn’t take into account–and doesn’t reflect reality (the monsters attacking the Great Wall are a dead giveaway).

That being said, in the multi-cultural world we now live in–which has always been that way, though many people didn’t like to think of it that way, so therefore it wasn’t–it’s in particularly bad taste to have white people come to the rescue of people of color, especially when it doesn’t reflect any objective reality.

That being said, Matt Damon is near the peak of his box office powers.  His most recent movie, Jason Bourne has debuted to $60 million; a nice chunk of change.

And besides,The Great Wall was produced by Legendary Pictures (which was recently purchased by a Chinese company) and is directed by a renown Chinese director, Zhang Yimou and has many Chinese actors in its cast.

So Damon is bringing something to the production besides his whiteness, though I just wish as a person (and as an actor) he were a bit more cognizant of some of the more dubious choices and decisions he seems to make pretty consistently lately.

Ouija: Origin of Evil – Trailer

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Contrary to what some people say 2014’s Ouija–based on the Hasbro board ‘game‘; And before you say it, Yes. that spooky-ass thing is an actual game–wasn’t a bad movie more than it was a ‘Meh’ movie.

And that’s coming from someone who had the misfortune of paying to see it.

It took what should have been terrifying–Ouija, or spirit boards are that all on their lonesome–and turned it into bland, horror-by-the-numbers schlock.

Despite that being the case the movie cost $5 million to produce and earned over $100 million worldwide; which is another way of saying that there’s no way that there wasn’t going to be a sequel.

Though this time around I think that the producers have keyed into how poorly the first movie was received (despite how much it earned).

Because this time around they hired Mike Flanagan, who helmed the far superior Oculus, to direct.

They also increased its budget–from $5 to 6 million for the sequel–so this time around Oculus: Origina of Evil should at least make an impression.

Something the original can’t claim to do.