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Iron Fist, Season Two – Review

I binged–a word I have every intention of continuing the use of–the second season of Marvel’s Iron Fist last week and it was…okay.

It course-corrects from first season, which seemed to spend as much time with Joy and Ward Meechum (Jessica Stroup and Tom Pelphrey) as it did with Danny Rand/Iron Fist (Finn Jones).

One issue that remains–perhaps the most pressing the problems–is the approach to the entire series (one shared with Marvel’s Luke Cage, it’s worth mentioning) in that it keeps doubling down on the realism, when they should be leaning into the more fantastical elements of both characters.

Here’s an example of what I mean. Here’s the trailer for The Five Deadly Venoms which I include because this is the sort of action that should inspire Marvel’s Iron Fist.

And sure, it’s a bit over the top, but that’s the point. It should be! We’re talking about people with abilities beyond those of mortal men.

The filmmakers shouldn’t be be afraid to lean into that (and sure, such an approach would likely facilitate greater use of stunt people, but I think it would be worth it).

Marvel’s Iron Fist – Teaser Trailer

After thoroughly enjoying Marvel’s Luke Cage (review coming soon!) imagine my surprise to see a new trailer for Marvel and Netflix’s upcoming Iron Fist on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/thebestofmarvel/status/783224733575839744

There’s no reveal (yet) of Iron Fist–which is a good thing–but it’s very mysterious and harkens back to the character’s origins.

Pretty cool.

Marvel’s Luke Cage – Trailer #1

To be honest, I’m not entirely sure why the Marvel series being produced for Netflix are so successful.  After all, they’re working with characters that I wouldn’t exactly call ‘first-stringers.’

Though that’s not by any means to imply that they aren’t beloved to many people, only that they’re plenty of more popular superheroes that have yet to appear in either the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), or what I like to call the MTU–or Marvel Televised Universe (too late to copyright ‘MTU,’ I’m guessing)–or who’s rights aren’t tied up with other entities, like Sony, Twentieth-Century Fox or Universal Pictures.

And speaking of Netflix, I should mention that I take umbrage to attempts by other entities, such as NBC, to determine how it is their ratings–which they apparently keep track of, though they don’t release–work.

I suspect that the numbers for their series are in toto significantly larger than any estimates that have yet been reported because, unlike domestic networks, Netflix has a huge international scope, which means that when a series like Daredevil premieres domestically–I believe that it is doing exactly the same, at the same time, all over the world.

So it stands to reason that premieres on Netflix would–when total audience numbers are taken into account–decimate the numbers for a network that relies entirely on domestic consumption.

Which begats another question, which is how to separate domestic viewership of Netflix programming from international numbers.

Whomever can figure that out in a fashion that is close to accurate will probably make a lot of money, be it in Dollars, Euros, Pounds or whatever.

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