The Man Who Murdered Time – Pt. 1

The Shadow was created by Walter B. Gibson, and long before he appeared in movies and television, he was a staple of radio.  HIs first appearance was in the 1930’s, and he’s had a huge influence on heroes (and villains) to follow.

For instance, the origin of Marvel Comics’ Iron Fist and Doctor Strange are remarkably similar to the Shadow’s, as is the that of Batman (from the Christopher Nolan movies) though the way he’s often depicted in the comics is very much in line with the Shadow as well.

The Shadow was Lamont Cranston (and Ken Allard, depending upon whether we’re talking about radio, television or novels.  This idea of identities within identities  is very similar to how Marvel’s Moon Knight has been portrayed), young wealthy man about town though having spend time in mysterious Asia gained the ability to cloud men’s minds.

Yet, can even the Shadow and all his mysterious powers stop a man with the ability to control Time?

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Dunkirk – Trailer 1

For an ‘EVENT THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD’–emphasis their’s, not mine–I readily admit that I have never heard of this particular conflict in World War II, though I don’t know if that’s due to a failing of the American education system or a de-emphasis of it because it doesn’t seem to directly involve the United States.

Having read on the Dunkirk evacuation on Wikipedia I assume it to be the latter because, while the United States did fight in WWII, we weren’t a part of this particular episode. 

That being said, I enjoy War films, though looking at the trailer I hope the movie has occasional elements of the miraculous and bizarre (which may be present, just not in the trailer) like Apocalypse Now because I can think of nothing as surreal as war, where extreme acts of inhumanity and brutality play out side by side with those of remarkable heroism and bravery.

Dunkirk is directed by Christopher Nolan (The Dark Knight, Inception) so I expect this movie to be very grounded, which is a pity.  

3 Reasons Why Batman v Superman Underperforming Isn’t Necessarily a Bad Thing

No one likes it when movies they support don’t do well at the box office.

Though few fans are as passionate–or as vocal–as those of Marvel Studios and DC Films.

All you have to do is to read the forums for sites that focus on superhero content–like Comicbookmovie.com and Superherohype.com, to name two–to realize that enthusiasms run deep whenever these studios and the characters they control are concerned.

For instance, even fans of Batman will acknowledge that Joel Schumacher’s interpretation wa akin to cinematic arsenic as far that the franchise and the character were concerned.

That being said, if that weren’t the case, would Christopher Nolan ever have  been given the chance to reinvigorate the franchise?

Probably not.

I mention it because it’s another good reason why Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice underperforming isn’t necessarily a bad thing because it’s fairly obvious that Zach Snyder–either through lack of knowledge or by design–doesn’t know how to interpret either Batman or Superman, so a creative refreshening is necessary.

“Warner Bros has already begun playing musical chairs with their executives,” though the question is is it enough.

Only time will tell because–if the Titanic has taught us anything–it’s that sometimes the danger is a lot greater than we assumed at first glance.

Can We Can The (Seemingly) Fake Diversity Talking Points Already?

David GoyerI am all for diversity, whether we’re talking about movies or just about anything else (especially policing, which is another discussion) but I get a bit tired of the people that have the ability to make a difference, and don’t, complaining about its absence.

For instance, David Goyer, the writer of screenplays for Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy (Batman BeginsThe Dark Knight, The Dark Night Rises, recently said in a recent interview that he wished that Hollywood would hire more women and people of color.

Seriously?  The problem with that is that statement is that people like David Goyer ARE Hollywood.  Keep in mind that this is the same guy that recently created DaVinci’s Demons, a series loosely based on the life of Renaissance man Leonardo DaVinci.

Now, I’ll be the first to admit that I haven’t seen the series, but if that’s how he feels, why not hire–I don’t know–women and people of color to direct (it’s entirely possible he’s done just that, but if that were the case for some reason I suspect that he wouldn’t be quite so reticent about discussing it) as well as work on the crew?

I also have no idea about how Kurt Sutter (the creator of Sons of Anarchy and The Bastard Executioner) feels about such things, but considering that Paris Barclay directed more episodes of Anarchy than any other director (and who happens to be black) I get the feeling that his track record on such things is probably pretty good–which isn’t to imply any sort of perfection.  Women and people of color and do any task that a movie requires.

Back to Goyer.  Looking at the credits for DaVinci’s Demons, there appears to be no female directors or–if the names are any indication, since pictures don’t accompany every IMDB entry–directors of color.  As far as the show’s writing staff goes, things are a slightly better for women, with six out of twenty being female.

David Goyer apparently cares about diversity, and making use of the talents and the perspectives that only women and people of color can provide.

And that’s admirable, though the next step is to actually hire them, which is where ‘diversity’ really comes into play.

Batman Needs To Shed The Cape

ComicbookmovieRecently DC revealed the latest costume for Batman, via Comicbookresources.  Despite not being a huge fan of either DC Comics or the character, I really like it.  The current iteration of Batman is caped, and while it sticks with tradition, these days it doesn’t quite make sense.

The character was originally created in the 1940’s with a design intended to strike fear into the hearts of criminals, with his cape being evocative of a bat’s wings.

In movies the most recent version of the character continues that tradition, and that’s the problem.  When Zach Snyder–director of Man of Steel as well as the upcoming Batman V. Superman: Dawn of Justice rebooted Superman he removed his shorts (so to speak), which were originally inspired by circus strongmen.

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There’s No Way Batman Can Take Captain America

Having just seen Avengers: Age of Ultron–review coming soon–can we just accept one thing:  Namely that there is no way on Earth that Batman can take Captain America?

Unlike what some people may believe…

And while not having seen Zach Snyder’s interpretation of the iconic superhero, there’s virtually no way that he’s in Captain America’s league.  After all, in Captain America: The Winter Soldier he’s doing stuff way beyond the kin of most men (which is actually pretty in line with the character in comics as well, while Batman tends to be portrayed as being much more agile than he has so far demonstrated in movies), such as mastering multiple forms of martial arts, and enhanced reflexes and speed, though most importantly he’s an actual soldier, and has fought in actual battles and wars, while Batman has experienced nothing on that scale.

This is on top of Batman being, essentially an ordinary man, while Steve Rogers is anything but, thanks to the Super Soldier serum.

When you combine that with the qualities that I have already mentioned, he’s way out of Batman’s league.

And keep in mind in Age of Ultron he literally TOSSES A MOTORCYCLE!  He uses momentum to do so, but it’s pretty impressive nonetheless.

While in the Batman movies (certainly the Christopher Nolan ones) he’s certainly less acrobatic that Cap, and definitely not as good a fighter (though this may have more to do with the design of the Batman costume, which if the way the character seems to move is any indication, is pretty restricting).

Still, based upon the movies not only is there virtually no way that Captain America can lose (unless Batman attacks in his BatWing, and even then…).

John M. Chu Does Action Better Than Christopher Nolan

Yeah, I didn’t believe it either, till began to think of Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies, starting with The Dark Knight Rises backward, and John M. Chu’s G.I. Joe: Retaliation, which I am currently watching on Netflix.

As much as I hate to admit it, Chu captures action much better than Nolan, which almost feel like sacrilege to say, but it’s true.

Maybe it has something to do with John M. Chu’s background in dance, because he seems to understand movement better, which is important.

That being said, Retaliation is composed of more than actions scenes, and overall Nolan is a much more ambitious, interesting director, though physical action just isn’t his thing (though I need to see Inception again, just to be sure).