Day of the Dead: Bloodline – Review 

While you can get away with calling Day of the Dead: Bloodline a ‘reimagining’ of George Romero’s classic, there’s nothing ‘bold’ about it (in fact, it’s such a loose interpretation that ‘Generic Zombie Thriller’ would work just as well).

Part of what made Romero’s movies so horrific (in the best possible way) was his penchant for slow-moving zombies.

Their speed was irrelevant because they’re so numerous.  They were a creeping horde of inevitability focused entirely on devouring anything living in their path.

It was this inexorable march that made them so terrifying;  no matter how fast you run, no matter how far you go, they’ll eventually catch up to you.

The zombies in ‘Bloodline’ are of the more athletic variety, which may create more immediate gratification in terms of (jump) scares, though the sense of inevitability, of tension, is lessened (If not lost entirely).

Another trait of a Romero zombie movie is what I like to think of as layered storytelling (a tendency that’s effective the less you see if it.  In his later movies he tended to hit you over then head with ‘MEANING!’ and ‘MESSAGE!!’ which made the movie that encased it a lot less interesting)

For instance, you can enjoy Romero’s Dawn of the Dead at face value–as simply a story of humans in a shopping mall facing off against the undead–or as a commentary on consumerism and how our need for stuff is literally devouring us.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline though?  What you see is literally what you get.  There’s nothing in the way of subtext, which isn’t a deal breaker if the action were more engaging or the characterization strong.

Neither of which, for the most part, happens to be the case.  Though the most damning criticism of the movie is that too many characters have more to worry about from catching ‘the stupids’ than a zombie virus.

By which I mean there’re  too many scenes where people die in circumstances where someone with an iota of common sense wouldn’t. If it happens one time you chalk it up to bad luck.

If it happens three or four more times, it’s really bad writing.

Day of the Dead: Bloodline is not by any means a terrible movie, just not particularly noteworthy.

Advertisements

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter – Teaser Trailer

Screenshot 2016-08-05 18.35.36

Did you know that George Romero (Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Creepshow, The Dark Half-one of the better adaptations of a Steven King story) was in contention to direct the first Resident Evil movie before Paul W.S. Anderson was chosen?

That the father of the modern day zombie movie somehow couldn’t approach a property that revolves around the walking dead to the satisfaction of Capcom (the creator of the Resident Evil video games) I find particularly interesting.

That being said, I haven’t  read Romero’s screenplay so I have no idea why it was rejected, though having seen virtually all the movies that make up the franchise, I have to wonder if some executive in Japan aren’t kicking themselves.

Or maybe committing seppuku if he hadn’t already (and yes, I’m reasonably sure that most , if not all, of Capcom’s executives are male).

Because, while the first movie is pretty decent, the latter certainly aren’t and in fact they get progressively worse as the series moves toward this, the the penultimate chapter.

Rebooting ‘Night of the Living Dead’

Hollywood is now talking about rebooting George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead,” which doesn’t necessarily need it, if you give it any thought.  That being said, I am not against it (as I tend to be) because the original is a good film, but also a product of its time, which was 1968.

So perhaps we’ll see a more topical ‘Dead’ film.  Another reason is that, unlike with John Carpenter, George Romero sometimes has a hand in the reboots of his films (if only a writing credit).

Continue reading

A Mediation On Violence In Film

I happen to be a big fan of genre films, with horror and science-fiction being two of my favorites.  Now, they aren’t for everyone, which I understand, though what I don’t get is the reason why some of those people don’t at least give them a chance.

Continue reading