A (Partial) Visual History of Iron Man Armor in the Movies

As a huge fan of the MCU’s Iron Man (the image below this text is from my collection) I had never heard of the Stan Lee Museum Popup, though luckily someone a bit more fortunate was able to attend past these pictures to me.

Below are replicas of various Iron Man armors from the films.

Mark IIron Man (2008)

Mark IIIron Man (2008)

Mark IIIIron Man (2008)

Mark VIIron Man 2 (2010)

Mark XLIIIron Man 3 (2013)

Mark XLIIIAvengers: Age Of Ultron (2015)

Mark XLVICaptain America: Civil War (2016)

Thodey’s armor, despite being based on Iron Man, is visually a different beast entirely with a more purposeful, military thrust more interested in form following function, making Stark’s suit gaudy by comparison.

War Machine

And while the statue’s based may say ‘The Avengers’  War Machine wasn’t in that movie (though he did appear in the Iron Man movies, Avengers: Age of Ultron and Avengers: Infinity War).

And I’m guessing this variant of his suit is either from Iron Man 2 or 3 (I thought it was bulkier in  Avengers: Age of Ultron and Infinity War.

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Avengers: Infinity War – Review 

The less said aboutthe particulars of Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Infinity War the better but know it rewards fans over casual viewers.  That’s not to say that if you haven’t seen all 18 of the prior MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) movies you won’t enjoy it, though if you haven’t seen any Infinity War isn’t a great place to start.

This is because Infinity War assumes you’re familiar with the adventures of Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Doctor Strange, Black Panther and so on and if you’re not you’re likely going to be a mite confused going forward.  Avengers: Infinity War is an epic, sprawling story that somehow manages to not only make sense, but feel significantly shorter than it’s 2 hour and 29 minute running time would lead one to assume.

Some people accuse the Marvel movies or being formulaic–and there’s a point to that in the sense that they tend to follow a particular pattern–but Infinity War turns that formula on it’s head because the movie revolves entirely around the villain, Thanos, and his efforts to procure–by hook or by crook–the five Infinity Stones that will enable him to remake reality in any way he feels necessary.

The heroes are delegated to deal with Thanos’ mechanizations though they’re almost entirely on the offensive, mainly due to the Black Order (like Gamora and Nebula, ‘children’ of Thanos) who are dispatched to obtain the Infinity Stones.

The movie is at turns funny and tragic and has one of the most somber endings of any movie in recent memory, never mind a MCU one.

Avengers: Infinity War is likely unlike any major tentpole movie you’ve ever seen and you’ll likely have a great time doing so.

Though if you’ve seen it already, what do you think?  Let me know down below.

The Last X-Men Movie?

According to Bleeding Cool, X-Men: Dark Phoenix will be the last X-Men movie released by Fox because it’s believed that Disney would have completed their purchase of the studio by that time (and it goes without saying that Kevin Feige is just itching to get his hands on characters like the X-Men and the Fantastic Four–and let’s not forget Doctor Doom, Annihilus and Galactus).

And that’s is a good thing.  The X-Men movies–once a crown jewel of Marvel Comics, in their time certainly more popular than Captain America, Iron Man or Thor––has been significantly less so in movies.

And I believe that their descent has a lot to do with the way they have been treated in the Fox movies, which is typically uneven (when they’re not being  inconsistent).

And before anyone even thinks Deadpool, that movie was literally an aberration.  Fox management were intent on NOT making that movie, that is till an effects test ‘leaked’ (who’s responsible is to this day unknown, though my money’s on either Ryan Reynolds or Tim Miller) and they saw the rabid response to it.

Then there’s Fox’s fetishization of Wolverine, neglecting the rest of the X-Men in the process.

So I for one can’t wait till we see the X-Men under the Marvel Studios banner.

So what do you think?  Sound off below.

Has DC Films Accepted That They Have Deep-Seated Problems, Or Are They Shifting Deck Chairs? Part II

I caught Star Wars: The Last Jedi last weekend and have no idea what all the hullabaloo is about (by which I mean I understand many of the complaints, though they’re not terribly persuasive when looked at in context).

It’s a decent movie though as far as I can tell all the rancor revolving around it is undeserved–though before the movie began there was a trailer for Avengers: Infinity War.

It’s a great trailer, though what interested me more (especially considering I have seen it alt least twenty times) is the response of someone in the theater.

She said, in reference to the trailer, “Those are the really good superheroes.” or something to that effect.

And that, for DC Films, is a problem because what they have lost is something that is extremely difficult to reclaim, and that’s mindshare (a topic I have mentioned before, but is worth revisiting).

At this point, when many moviegoers think of superheroes they think of Iron Man, Captain America or Thor, and to a lesser extent Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman.

That is a problem because–while it doesn’t mean that people won’t see movies with other characters–it does make it likely that they will occupy a lower tier in terms of their preferences.

So, unless Marvel Studios screws up in a big way there’s virtually no way DC Films is going to close the gap.

Which is why–as I have also said before–they should stop trying.

In other words, the only thing that can save DC Films is that they acknowledge that Marvel Studios has won because that will enable them to do what they should have done in the first place, which is to just produce engaging, fun superhero films without the onus of trying to outrun the fastest kid on the block.

Another reason I brought this up is because Warner Bros recently appointed Walter Hamada as head of DC Films.  Harada has been a producer behind franchises like The Conjuring and IT, though it remains to be seen if his success will transfer to the DCEU.

Spider-Man: Homecoming – Trailer 3

Cutting an effective trailer is a strange mix of art and science and too much of either can ruin it.

And they’re more important than you think.

Part of what saved Suicide Squad was the  trailer, which (unfortunatel) made promises the movie itself didn’t quite live up to, was so well-received by movie goers.

By the same token, they can give away plot points that might better be left uNSAIDs (such as when Doomsday was revealed in the Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice trailer).

Though just so no one thinks I am picking on the DCEU, there was a scene from the first Avengers when the Hulk saves Iron Man, who’s falling after having ‘delivered’ a nuclear weapon to the Chtauri.

It wasn’t a spoiler but it did reveal a scene that would have been better served seen first in the context of the movie.

And speaking of ‘scenes that would have been better served seen first in the context of the movie’ the trailers for Marvel Studios/Sony Pictures Spider-Man: Homecoming haven’t crossed the line into spoiler territory, but they have revealed moments that would perhaps be better served by not beight first seen in the trailer.

Such as learning that Spidey’s uniform is filled to the gills with Stark-tech.


It doesn’t break the movie to learn this in advance–besides, hints were laid out in Captain  America: Civil War that this is not your father’s Spider-Man costume, so it wasn’t a huge reach.

THough it would have still been a pleasant surprise NOT to know about it ahead of time.

Power Rangers Are GO (Apologies To The Thunderbirds)

I wouldn’t call myself a fan of the Power Rangers–there are too many things that I can’t quite get my head around about them that get in the way, such as why is it that the lower section of their masks (which are actually helmets by the way) molded like the lower section of a human face?  Wouldn’t it be easier just to show that part of the actors’ actual faces?

And I get that the Power Rangers began as an import from Japan, so the people playing the Rangers during action scenes weren’t the same people who played them in other sequences, but (hopefully?) that issue is being dealt with in the upcoming movie, so it makes little sense to continue with the full-face helmet/mask.

And speaking of that, an actors’ face is one of the most important tools in the craft.

Seeing that you’re removing that from the equation with the Power Rangers (unless they’re going to do like Marvel Studios does with Iron Man) it seems you’re losing a lot of value.

That being said, the the new motion poster they just released is pretty bad-ass.

Costumes Really, Really Matter

Being a huge comic geek can at times be a double-edged sword despite the fact that with Marvel Studios, DC Entertainment and others producing record amounts of superhero-based content.

Part of the trepidation is due to the fact that studios aren’t catering exclusively to comic book readers, so they have produce movies with the non-comic reader in mind.

Which is a subtle way of saying that what comic readers typically find acceptable, non-comic readers don’t.

This is why, when Bryan Singer produced the movie based on Marvel’s X-Men they were dressed in black leather, with little indication–at least in terms of costumes–of their comic book origins.

And to a degree that’s understandable, but for people who’ve followed these characters since childhood–I actually learned to read from comics, so they’re particularly important to me–it’s a bit disappointing.

Which is why when I saw the pictures of Benedict Cumberbatch from Marvel Studio’s upcoming Doctor Strange, part of me sang with glee.

IMG_1794

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As far as I can tell, it’s a pretty good interpretation, though don’t take my word for it, check out the original below!

That being said I am not sure what’s going on with the belt (I am getting a definite Iron Man vibe from it–not a good thing).