The Man Who Murdered Time, Part 3

Last time we learned that the world was caught in a time loop, to repeat New Year’s Day for all time, due to the sinsistent machinations of mad scientist Willard Hughes and his time machine.

But we also learned that there was a method to his madness:  Hughes was dying, though his time machine would enable him to live forever!

That it enabled him to torture his well-to-do cousin as well was icing on the cake.

But Hughes didn’t count on the Shadow in this, the penultimate chapter of The Man Who Murdered Time!

[YouTube=https://youtu.be/FiCut4yuzy4]

The Man Who Murdered Time – Part 2

Sorry about the delay in getting this out. I had actually written this post last week, but the WordPress mobile app ate it.

Luckily I wrote a rough draft (on paper!), so I didn’t start from scratch.

The time machine, created by Willard Hughes in Part 1, is activated and its insidious purpose is made known as New Year’s Day repeats, seemingly in perpetuity.

No one but Lamont Cranston–who’s secretly the Shadow, the scourge of evil and those that commit it– is immune for to its effects due to his superior will and his training by yogis.

His trusted assistant, Margo Lane, has none of his immunity, though as long as he’s in physical contact with her she too is able to resist the machine’s sinister effects.

Though someone has to stop the infernal machinations of Willard Hughes, and that person isn’t Lamont Cranston, but the Shadow.

The Hornet’s Sting Returns!

I have been a fan of comics since I learned to read–and in fact they contributed significantly to that happening–though eventually my love for the medium branched off into other adjacent areas fairly quickly.

One of my favorite offshoots was old-time radio.  I was an avid listener of the CBS Radio Mystery Theater in the  80’s and 90’s, though I also enjoyed shows from earlier, such as The Shadow and The Green Hornet

There was something fascinating about the Green Hornet.  Maybe it was for me he was Batman before there was a Batman with an added bonus of having an uber-competent assistant, Kato (played by Bruce Lee!). 

Though admittedly part of my admiration grew from watching him kick the stuffing out of Robin on the fun and campy Batman television series from the 1960’s.

The 2011 Seth Rogan and Jay Chou version of the Green Hornet and Kato were okay, but they moved away from the grittier elements of the radio shows, to a more comedic take. 

Though there’s talk of a reboot to be directed by Gavin O’Connor (Warrior, The Accountant), who’s known for his visceral, kinetic fare.  

He’s a prefect choice to bring the physicality and a brutalness to the project, which the 2011 movie lacked.  

New-Gen: New Player in Town?

Comic book characters have been on television and in movies for many years, though the publishers of such characters have in the past been more numerous.

These days, most superhero films either come from either Marvel Studios (a division of Walt Disney, and based upon characters like Spider-Man, Captain America, The Fantastic Four,  Thor, the Avengers, Iron Man, etc) or DC Comics (part of Warner Brothers, and the home of  Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, The Justice League, etc).

Comics character-based films from other companies exist, but tend not to have the influence or reach of those from ‘The Big Two,’ which is not to say that there haven’t been attempts by others entities to establish franchises based upon superheroes.

Continue reading