A (Partial) Visual History of Iron Man Armor in the Movies

As a huge fan of the MCU’s Iron Man (the image below this text is from my collection) I had never heard of the Stan Lee Museum Popup, though luckily someone a bit more fortunate was able to attend past these pictures to me.

Below are replicas of various Iron Man armors from the films.

Mark IIron Man (2008)

Mark IIIron Man (2008)

Mark IIIIron Man (2008)

Mark VIIron Man 2 (2010)

Mark XLIIIron Man 3 (2013)

Mark XLIIIAvengers: Age Of Ultron (2015)

Mark XLVICaptain America: Civil War (2016)

Thodey’s armor, despite being based on Iron Man, is visually a different beast entirely with a more purposeful, military thrust more interested in form following function, making Stark’s suit gaudy by comparison.

War Machine

And while the statue’s based may say ‘The Avengers’  War Machine wasn’t in that movie (though he did appear in the Iron Man movies, Avengers: Age of Ultron and Avengers: Infinity War).

And I’m guessing this variant of his suit is either from Iron Man 2 or 3 (I thought it was bulkier in  Avengers: Age of Ultron and Infinity War.

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Avengers: Infinity War – Final Trailer

“Let’s talk about this plan of yours.” says Star-Lord, while Peter Parker looks on bemused, while Drax looks just grim. “I think it’s good, except it sucks. Let me do the plan, that way it might be really good.”

“Wow.” Tony Stark relies, perfectly capturing how much of an ass he thinks Quill is in a single exclamation.

If I weren’t already sold on Avengers: Infinity War that exchange between Star-Lord and Iron Man sealed the deal because in that one moment you get more character development than the entirety of virtually anything from the DCEU (plus it showed what happens when you have two massive egos occupying the same space at the same space at the same time).

And can Doctor Strange catch a break?  Dormammu literally spent an eternity–or what felt like one–killing him in his own movie, only to have one of Thanos’ children try a similar trick.

Marvel’s Daredevil S2:E4 – Penny and Dime

Screenshot 2016-03-18 08.17.49

I moved my Marvel’s Daredevil Season Two discussions from ‘Reviews’ to ‘My Two Cents’ because–as opposed to an actual review–I tend to discuss interesting points about the episode.

Besides, to write an actual review mens that I would have to commit to a spoiler or two, which I have no intention of doing because, as Tony Stark would say, ‘that’s a very dick move.’

If you recall, in my last post I compared Frank Castle to a shark, in that it is what it is, and does what it does.  It doesn’t hate you, it doesn’t love you; in fact it could care less one way or the other about you personally.

All it knows is hunger, and humans–despite our illusions about being at the top of the food chain–fill that niche quite well.

But the problem with that is that when a shark takes–or even attempts–to harm a human, we dedicate not insubstantial energy, time and expense to find, and kill, that animal.

Because while there may be plenty of animals that are powerful enough to kill us, when we set our minds to it no creature on Earth is as lethal.

So it goes with the Punisher, who after taken out seemingly half the gangs and mobsters in Hell’s Kitchen, becomes the hunted as the Irish mob decides to take a more proactive stance.

And despite Castle’s more than obvious feelings about the criminal element, he has a weakness that will be exploited by those that aim to do him harm.

This is particularly brutal episode, as it’s revealed that Castle is called ‘the Punisher’ not only because of the damage he’s capable of dishing out, but is capable of taking.

The Avengers: Age Of Ultron Trailer – Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Edition

Kevin Feige, you cheeky bastard.  It appears that you pulled a fast one.  When the trailer for The Avengers: Age Of Ultron was leaked prior to it appearing on Marvel’s Agent’s Of S.H.I.E.L.D. I assumed that that was the end of this story.  Sure, Marvel Studios handed things pretty gracefully, but I thought it was time to move on.

How wrong I was.

The trailer that was released during S.H.I.E.L.D. is quite similar to the leaked trailer, but not the same, and as anyone knows, the Devil is in the details.  The fist, and most noticeable difference is that there’s an extended party scene (which the first trailer only touches upon), where Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr) and Jim Rhodes (Don Cheadle) attempt to lift Thor’s hammer.Tony and Rhody Attempt to lift Thor's hammer

Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johansson) doesn’t bother, because she knows that boys will be boys.

Though things get interesting with Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), otherwise known as Captain America, tries.

Thor's expression

Thor (Chris Hemsworth) appears mildly concerned, especially since he knows that one has to be deemed worthy by the magics that permeate the hammer to lift it, and who’s worthier than Captain America?

From that point on, the trailer mostly follows similar beats as the first one, though there are small differences.

Such as the image below of Black Widow staring at something…

Black Widow staring

Which was followed by this image of the Chituari scepter from 2013’s The Avengers (and what we learn give the Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver their abilities from Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Ctharia weaponCombined with earlier scenes of Captian America breaking into a castle, I believe that they show his his search for the origins of Winter Soldier, and that he finds the hideout of Baron von Strucker (Thomas Kretschmann).

Though there’s an image that appears in both versions that I am very curious about, which is of an attractively-lit room that’s serving as a ballet studio, though why is it in the trailer?  Did Joss Whedon (who may not have cut it) want to add a scene of beauty to contrast all the larger-than-life heroics that proceeded it?

Ballet Dancers

Maybe, but I doubt it because it’s too obvious.  I suspect that the dancers may have something to do with the Scarlet Witch, if only because it’s not exactly the style of Black Widow or Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders).

‘Ragnarok’ Trailer

I am not terribly familiar with the Norse concept of Ragnarök, though I do know that it revolves around the end of the world and all sorts of unpleasantness (which according to Wikipedia doesn’t typically include really large lizard-like monsters).  I should mention that I found this trailer while I was searching for the trailer for Robert Downey Jr’s. The Judge, where he apparently tries to play a character that’s only a little bit like Tony Stark.

It’s strangely difficult to find.

Though Ragnarok looks almost Disney-like, till the intrepid explorers come upon a cave covered with human bones, that is.

Movie Mistakes: ‘Iron Man 3’

Iron Patriot
Generally I don’t particularly care about these sorts of things, but having seen “Iron Man 3” perhaps more times than should be legal, I noticed this little error.

Truth be told, it’s less of an error than the filmmakers apparently showing us what they can get away with when viewers are in awe over one of their favorite comic characters appearing on the big screen (for the fourth time).  What happens is that James “Rhodey” Rhodes/War Machine/Iron Patriot (Don Cheadle) is captured by Aldrich Killian/Fake Mandarin (Guy Pearce), who uses his Extremis-derived abilities to superheat a section of the armor, with the intention of forcing Rhodey to abandon it.

Killian knows that he’s damaging the surface of the armor, and so he strongly suggests that his henchman, Savin (James Badge Dale) had better be able to fix it.  Now, Savin may indeed be talented, but prior to this moment the movie gave no indication he also had some pretty awesome metallurgical, as well as painting, skills because the next time we see the Iron Patriot armor, there’s no sign that there was any damage at all.

I mean not even a smudge of the paint.  I also know that we’re watching a movie based on a comic book, but Savin making what looked like considerable damage disappear is probably the most outlandish thing in the movie.  Though you have to admit that the man is talented, and if Tony needed any help in his lab, he could do worse than hire him.

Iron Patriot

By the way, anyone that has been following the Iron Man films–Yes, even “Iron Man 2!”–knows that Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey, Jr.) has an miniature Arc reactor in his chest, which keeps a piece of shrapnel from entering his heart, which is pretty much at the center of the chest (which is why the armored suits he wears don’t have the chest repulser off to the left or right).

In the penultimate act of the movie, where (Spoiler Alert!) where Tony Stark and Rhodes are squaring off against the Extremis-enhanced forces of the Fake Mandarin (that’s not his name, but if you have seen the Marvel One-Shot, “All Hail The King” you know it’s true) the Arc reactor is in the center of his chest, where the Universe and Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Larry Lieber and Don Heck intended it to be…

Arc Reactor III

Only to find that in later scenes it has somehow shifted considerably–and quite noticeably–to the right.  It’s not like it’s now on his shoulder or something, but it’s definitely no longer in the center of his chest.

Arc Reactor II

Occam’s Razor posits that when faced with explaining why or how an event happened, the simplest explanation with the fewest assumptions is more likely than not the correct one.  So, considering that that Arc reactor prop was entirely practical, it was probably somehow adhered to Robert Downey, Jr.’s chest, and with all the activity that the film required from him, shifted a bit.

And you know what, I’m OK with that because what the filmmakers could have went with was a CGI Arc reactor, as opposed to a practical one, though the problems it would bring would probably quickly disabuse them of the notion.  For instance, if it were computer-generated, it would have to look slightly different every time it appeared on screen because of changes in lighting conditions as well as his body shifting.

It’s certainly doable, by why would anyone want the added cost, when you could create an Arc reactor medallion, have him wear it, and save yourself (probably) thousands of dollars.

And besides, we’ve seen a movie that was so chock-full of computer generated effects that even the costume that the actor wore wasn’t real.

And we all know how well that went.

Like this movie, I am awesome!

A Movie About Me!  What Could Go Wrong?

Why The Vision Shouldn’t Begin Life As J.A.R.V.I.S

http://marvel.wikia.com/Vision_(Earth-616)

Image courtesy of Marvel Wiki

Unlike in the case of Bryan Singer‘s “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” as of this writing I haven’t seen anything from Joss Whedon‘s “The Avengers: Age of Ultron,” though it was made known that Paul Bettany (who voiced the Tony Stark’s AI, known as J.A.R.V.I.S) would be playing the synthizoid known as the Vision.

For those not familiar with the comics, the Vision was created by Ultron, designed to defeat the Avengers (though eventually he becomes a good guy).  The movies seem to be following a similar trajectory as the comics, but with one (rumored) difference:  Vision will somehow be an offshoot of Tony Stark’s J.A.R.V.I.S.

That is a really bad idea for two reasons:  The first is personal.  I have never been fond of J.A.R.V.I.S because Tony Stark’s AI is based on an “actual” character, Jarvis, who was the butler of the Avengers.

Whom I really liked.

http://marvel.wikia.com/Edwin_Jarvis_(Earth-616)

Yeah, I am kind of awesome.

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