Rogue One: Trailer

I enjoyed J.J. Abrams’ interpretation of the Star Wars universe with The Force Awakens, but it felt too shiny, too clean.

Now Rogue One feels like a Star Wars movie should.

Or maybe it’s just seeing old school Star Destroyers and the original Death Star, though I think that it’s the grim tone, the grit and the desperation of a Rebel Alliance put on the ropes by an ascendant Imperial Empire.

Desperation suits Star Wars.

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Somehow Star Wars: The Force Awakens Hasn’t Made As Much As Avatar

Star Wars: The Force Awakens–I’m starting to warm up to that subtitle, at last–is approaching the box office of Avatar and I don’t understand it.

What’s confused me is that I don’t understand how it is that Avatar was able to reach such box office heights in the first place.

Let’s be honest, it’s not a particularly innovative movie–besides how it was made, that is–and the story is essentially cowboys and indians (Cowboys & Aliens?) with an environmental twist.

(Though if I were honest, it lost me when they had an AMP–Amplified Mobility Platform–grab a knife).

It’s a battle suit.  Make the weapon part of it.  That way, it can’t drop it.

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Anyway, that’s not to say that the latest Star Wars movie is innovative either–it’s essentially Star Wars: A New Hope, which was mildly disappointing,  with some shiny new effects.

That being said, after Lucas’ machine-tooled prequels (which were as innovative as Avatar in their own way) Star Wars fans would have paid virtually anything to see a movie evocative of the original trilogy.

And if LucasFilm under Disney is capable of nothing else it’s creating audience-pleasing entertainment (if their Pixar, Marvel Studios and Disney Animation divisions are any indicator) for the greatest possible amount of people.

 

 

Star Wars: The Force Awakens -Review

J.J. Abrams, the director of Star Wars: The Force Awakens had a pretty serious job ahead of him.  In directed the latest Star Wars movies he had to manage to invigorate the franchise, while not alienating long-time fans of the movie.

I’ve discussed this point and more below in my first video review.  It’s a feature that I tend to explore more in future, particularly for bigger movies.

That being said, overall Abrams did a good job, but it’s not perfect.

Independence Day: Resurgence – Trailer

The trailer for the latest chapter in the Independence Day saga dropped a few hours ago, and to be honest I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed.  Between Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Captain America: Civil War and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and X-Men: Apocalypse there are some huge movies coming out relatively soon.

There’s potentially millions riding on when these movies drop because–as we have seen with In The Heart Of The Sea, an otherwise decent looking movie except for the fact that it’s expensive (supposedly somewhere in the ballpark of $100 million) and was released a week before Star Wars: The Force Awakens–I get the feeling that one, or even two of these movies aren’t going to do nearly as well as prognosticators like to think.

Which leads to Independence Day: Resurgence.  While it’s good to see Roland Emmerich moving away from the whitewashing of gay history in Stonewall, I am not sure that a sequel to Independence Day–sans Will Smith–has the box office muscle to take on Captain America, Batman and BB-8.

Like I implied earlier, if this is released with a few months of breathing room, it will probably do fine.  If it goes against any of the movies I’ve listed above–minus In The Heart Of The Sea, which will likely have left theaters–then Independence Day: Resurgence might not be able to stand against the tentpole tsunami soon to hit land.

Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens : Teaser Trailer

I was thinking that I don’t particularly care about the upcoming Star Wars prequels, till I saw the crashed Star Destroyer in the desert…now I am getting a bit jazzed.

Then there were the melty Darth Vader helmet (which looked like it was gone over a bit too much), new-style Stormtroopers, and various Jedi.

I’m not The Avengers: The Age of Ultron jazzed, nor Ant-Man jazzed, but it’s on the radar.

Tomorrowland – Official Trailer #1

It figures that Dr. Gregory House (Hugh Laurie, in what at first glance appears to be a ridiculous-looking costume) would be playing a bad guy (or a misunderstood one) in the new Tomorrowland trailer.

It’s interesting because it gives more context to what the movie is about, which it really, really needed because–as far as I am concerned–it wouldn’t be the first time that I avoided a movie because of bad marketing.

Besides, what I think is more interesting is that it’s establishing a niche for the type of films that Disney is going to produce considering that they have Marvel Studios for superheroes, Lucasfilm for Star Wars and Pixar for cutting edge animation and more experimental storylines, and Disney Animation for reinterpreting Disney animation for a new audience.

The Ugly Side Of Fandom

If you’ve seen videos of cosplay or the various ‘Cons’ the first thing you notice is that they feature all sorts of quirky, colorful (and often brilliant) costumes, which is why it’s understandable if you thought that that was what comic geek culture was all about (besides costumes and the–virtual–worship of certain movies and comic characters).

And for the most part, you’d be right, though there are instances when a comic character that began “life” as a white person, and is reinterpreted as a person of color in the movies (Oddly, when a male character was reinterpreted as female, in the case of 2004 reboot of Battlestar Galactica, when Starbuck was underwent gender reassignment, fans only offered token resistance while most were relatively sanguine about it) when you often see the ugly side of fandom.

Before I begin, you’ll noticed that I deliberately don’t use the term “race” because, besides being a misnomer, it has always bothered me because white people are genetically identical to black people, yellow people, beige people, and so on.

I bring this up because the reaction to John Boyega, dressed as a stormtrooper in the beginning of the Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer, has been pretty distressing for some members of the fan community.

Comic book fans tend to be sticklers for detail, which to a degree I can understand. If someone has been following a character for the better part of their lives, it probably feels amazing to see the character on the big screen; till that is, they see that the character has been interpreted in a manner opposite to what they have known and anticipated.

That being said, it feels that whenever an actor of color is cast in a prominent role in a comic book movie, some in the fan community lose all sense of propriety, and logic goes out the window.

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