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Blade Runner 2049 – Review

Someone, after seeing the cut of Blade Runner 2049 that was released to theaters called it ‘the most expensive art film in history.’

And that’s pretty accurate.

Blade Runner 2049 is beautiful to look at but there’s a languidness, a subtleness about it that doesn’t do the material any favors. Virtually everything about it is idiosyncratic, from the casting of Ryan Gosling–who makes Keanu Reeves seem expressive–to the way the movie was shot, everything feels as if it’s the result of a singular vision (which it isn’t in the sense that NO movie is a singular vision in the sense that hundreds of people are involved though there’s typically one person making the final decision).

And if we were talking about vision of it’s director, Denis Villeneuve, whom no one apparently suggested that maybe the movie would have been better received if it were a half hour shorter (which it could have easily been done with nary a change in any plot details).

That being said, Blade Runner 2049 is what it is, namely the uncompromising vision of a very expressive, passionate director.

Which was oddly enough the problem; sometimes a little compromise can go a long way.

Slender Man – Review

If you were to make your moviegoing decisions based upon reviews you’d likely haven’t seen Sylvain White’s Slender Man.

And that’s okay because it’s not a terribly good movie. The antagonist–Slender Man itself (a character Angus Scrimm did much better in the Phantasm movies pre-Internet meme) is a cypher in that you have no idea why or how it does what it does.

Better written movies can get away with not revealing important details about characters because there’s likely enough going on that the exclusion creates an air of mystery,

Or even anticipation.

Here you’re left wondering why things are unfolding as they do, which ends up frustrating more than anything else.

Though that’s not quite fair in that you do know to an extent why things unfold as they do though when it’s likely because better movies–The Ring and to a lesser extent, A Nightmare On Elm Street–did if first.

Which proves, if nothing else, that sometimes critics are right.

Venom – Official Trailer # 2

Having just watched the latest trailer for Sony’s–In Association With Marvel!–Venom I have to admit that I like it a lot more than the first.

Though the American accent Tom Hardy appears to be ruining? Not so much.

But don’t misinterpret my meaning. I still think Venom–and the other characters of the SpiderVerse–belong with Marvel Studios though with the deal between Disney and 20th Century Fox essentially done, I’m content knowing the Marvel Studios sandbox has more than enough action figures to play with.

And before anyone even thinks it, the X-Men and Fantastic Four returning to Marvel Studios ISN’T a monopoly. They’re Marvel Comics characters so by way of analogy that’s like saying that reuniting those children separated from their families by our ‘President’ is wrong because…?

And besides, this is Sony so I have to do is be patient because the likelihood is high they’ll overplay their hand, screwing up the good will Marvel has returned to them with Spider-Man: Homecoming.

Slender Man – Official Trailer 2

Well, that was a…trailer?

Not to sound underwhelmed by Sylvain White’s (The Losers) upcoming Slender Man but what the stylized horror movie has apparently missed is that someone has actually been killed in the Internet meme’s name.

Why not take that incident–in the vein (pardon the pun) of The Blair Witch II: Book of Shadows and build a movie around that as opposed to what looks like a highly stylized take on the Slender Man legend?

And sure, accusations of bad taste and taking advantage of a very real tragedy would be thrown about but truth be told that’s likely to happen anyway.

That being said, I’d essentially mimic the real life case, then gradually introduce elements of the Slender Man ‘legend,’ asking viewers to judge whether or not what unfolded on screen was ‘real’ or all in the characters’ minds.

And it would be absolutely terrifying and not so reliant on FX, as this movie appears to be.

Great poster though.

Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween – Official Trailer

I didn’t see the first Goosebumps because–in hindsight–I don’t believe in horror for children.

By which I mean I grew up in the Seventies and distinctly remembering going to the theater with my brothers and some friends to see Arnold.

I haven’t seen it since but recall it revolving around a dead guy marrying a very live woman (!)–I assume for his money–and how everyone around them was dying by violent means.

I particularly recall a lady likely having her worse day ever due to acid placed in her face cream (why didn’t it burn her hands? That’s a question I’d certainly ask now but as a youngster? It didn’t even occur to me).

Though I also realize that if I were to see it today I’d likely consider it to be very, very tame.

As I left the theater in tears little did I realize that it would be my gateway drug into horror movies.

I also have quite fond memories of The Blood On Satan’s Claw

Would I have felt the same if either movie were geared toward the younger set? Maybe? Maybe not but it was the shock of what I saw that really got my synapses firing and turned barely a spark of interest into a life-long appreciation of a typically under appreciated genre.

Hidden Message in the Title of the Spider-Man: Homecoming Sequel?

It’s been revealed by Kevin Feige, President of Marvel Studios, that the title of the Spider-Man: Homecoming sequel will be Spider-Man: Far From Home.

And I genuinely have a problem with that because one way I interpreted the title of the first movie was as a return of Spider-Man back to where he belongs (never mind that the more obvious meaning was that it literally revolved around the preparation for Peter Parker’s first Homecoming dance).

Now, it’s rumored that the sequel takes place during a class trip to Europe, making ‘Far From Home’ a fitting subtitle.

But let’s look a little deeper. Just as Spider-Man: Homecoming could be interpreted as the return of Spidey to the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) could Spider-Man: Far From Home be read as an end of Spider-Man in the MCU?

The nature of the deal between Marvel Studios and Sony has always been a temporary one, though there has always been a bit of uncertainty around when it ends exactly.

As far as I’m aware, Spider-Man is a part of the MCU through Avengers 4 and the Spider-Man sequel, which makes me wonder if the subtitle of the Spider-Man sequel is a cagey way of Feige saying that Spidey’s tour of duty in the MCU is at an end?

Venom – Official Trailer # 2

Screenshot 2018-04-24 03.07.17Do you recall the first Venom trailer and how disappointing it was?  Apparently Sony picked up on that vibe, so this time they gave us quite a bit more of Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) exhibiting his powers.

And that’s a good thing though for some perhaps it’s a little bit too late.

 

 

 

Though Venom aside, I found this more interesting.

Screenshot 2018-04-24 01.53.58

The reason why is because because it’s new, and apparently a sign Marvel Studios wants to separate its productions from those that just happen to use their properties.

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