Full Metal Alchemist – Official Trailer

Screenshot 2017-11-02 01.51.33I recall that someone explained why it is that Japanese people in anime don’t look particularly Japanese, but I don’t recall the explanation (which implies that it didn’t particularly resonate for me).

I should mention that my feeling also doesn’t apply to all anime.  Characters from the works of Hayao Miyzaki appear distinctly Japanese (in terms of how they’re drawn).

Which is one of the reasons I enjoyed Gantz: 0:  all the characters looked Japanese (which makes sense when something takes place in Japan).

I was bothered as much as anyone else by Scarlett Johansson’s casting as the Major in Ghost in the Shell though less because she was playing a Japanese character–since as I explained earlier, the Major never looked Japanese to me–more than I knew she was despite that fact and therefore should be played by a Japanese person.

Though having seen the trailer for Full Metal Alchemist–filmed with an entirely Japanese cast–it looks a bit…off, especially compared to the episodes of the anime I have seen.

It’s sort of weird, but it reminds me of someone’s interpretation of Full Metal Alchemist–which it obviously is–but I mean in a more deeper, essential sense of who these characters are.

It’s like it were being made especially for the Japanese market–which in a sense it is–after the Hollywood version.

If that makes any sense.

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Close The X-Files

Everything that lives, eventually dies.

And that’s okay because it’s the fear of death, of Thanatos, that drives all animals, of which we are, to procreate (so that our genes–and what are we if not the genetic material that literally makes us up–live on in our children).

Immortality of a sort.

What does the above idea have to do with The X-Files, a series that aired from 1993 to 2002 on Fox, and spawned two movies, The X-Files: Fight the Future in 1998 and The X-Files: I Want to Believe in 2008?

Well, there’s talk of another ‘event series’ of The X-Files, following the last six-episode series that aired in 2016.

And I wish they’d just stop.  The original series started promisingly, with two FBI agents working to uncover secrets that our government denied ever existed, with an emphasis on UFO mythology, combined with stand-alone stories that existed outside the aforementioned overarching mythos.

And that was good, till it became so entangled in that ungainly mythology that it literally collapsed under it (and I’m not being hyperbolic.  The series literally became incomprehensible and nonsensical, sometime with job a single episode).

If it had just gone away longer it would acted as a breather, a palate cleanser, to remove the bitter, ash-like taste of a show that just.  Refuses.  To.  Die.

And maybe David Ducovny and Jillian Anderson would be unable (or unwilling) to return.

If so then just recast, creating a world that would be both familiar and unfamiliar at the same time to those who remembered the original series with fondness.

As it stands, these X-Files event series remind me less of the original show than The Walkind Dead, which is the true face of immortality.

Support the LEGO Eagle Transporter

Support LEGO potentially creating a LEGO-ized version of the Eagle Transporter from Space: 1999, one of the most awesome and iconic spaceships in television history.

space-1999-year-one-1No matter if your preference is for the more cerebral Year One…

 

 

 

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Or more dynamic Year Two, you can’t go wrong.

 

 

 

Though most fans of Gerry Anderson’s (arguably) best life action series would want most is a Year Three, but that’s unlikely to happen anytime soon because ITV (the current rights holder) are apparently doing everything they can to ensure that it doesn’t.

(To be fair in 2012 there was talk of a reboot, Space: 2099, but that fell by the wayside).

As I implied, I wouldn’t hold my breath for a new series, so one way to0 show your love is to create create an account at LEGO Ideas and answer a few questions (all relevant to the potential project).

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Besides, if LEGO does an Eagle, can a Hawk be far behind?

And if there’s enough interest to create a LEGO-ized Hawk, who knows what can happen?

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Colony, Ep. 1 – Review

Screenshot 2015-12-23 21.34.30.pngWhen we first meet Will Bowman (Josh Halloway) he’s preparing breakfast–or at least attempting to–for his family, that consists of his wife Katie (Sarah Wayne Callies, most recently of The Walking Dead) and three children, before he heads out to work.

Though one of his sons is missing, and Will is doing all he can to put on a brave face for his family.

The feeling that things aren’t quite right not only with the Bowman family, but the world they live in, permeates Colony.  People barter for the most basic goods and Los Angeles is under martial law, and is surrounded by a huge wall evocative of John Carpenter’s underrated Escape From L.A.

And if that weren’t bad enough, order is maintained by a mysterious black-suited military force of unknown origin.

The how’s and why’s are revealed grudgingly so, while there isn’t yet enough information to understand what’s happened and why things are as they are, it adds an extra level of interest beyond people making do the  best they can in what amounts to a police state.

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Carlton Cuse, the prolific producer of The Strain and Lost, has created a future that visually resembles our own (though the technology in some instances is a bit more advanced) but with the addition of an unknown threat that has turned the place where dreams are made into a nightmare.

Colony premiers January 14 on USA.

Netflix and the Transformation of How We View Television

Netflix logoI imagine that television executives haven’t been too glad about the ascension of alternative viewing options–they’re still reeling from cable– beyond the channels within their control, but I honestly think that if they’re able to see beyond their own parochial interests they’ll come to realize what a boon it can potentially be for them in the long term.

Reason being, I have discovered more new–to me–television shows via Netflix than I ever have via network television.   And what’s most interesting is that subject-wise they’re certainly more varied than anything that I would normally watch.

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Why You Should Be Watching “United States Of Tara” On Netflix

Part of what makes Netflix (and services like Hulu) so awesome is that whenever you see a series, no matter when it was actually released, it’s new to you.

Having recently watched Keir Gilchrist in Dark Summer I was impressed enough with his performance to seek out more of his work, so when I learned that he also starred in Showtime’s United States of Tara I decided to give it a watch.

And it’s a surprisingly entertaining show–though that may have a little to with me binging on it.

And the first thing that came to mind is that United States of Tara initially feels like a Weeds clone (which aired on HBO), down to the opening and theme song, while different, plays visually and aurally similar to Little Boxes.

Little Boxes

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Official Comic-Con Trailer – Fear The Walking Dead

Ah, that’s the way they’re going to go!  For awhile I was wondering how AMC brass were going to approach the upcoming AMC partner series to their critical and ratings darling, The Walking Dead.

Now I get it.  It seems that the upcoming spinoff will spend most of its time dealing with the beginning of the zombie threat, when it was in its nascent stages, and could have possibly been averted.

You can almost call it a prequel, in the sense that what takes place in the Fear The Walking Dead are the happenings that Sheriff Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) was in a coma for.

In other words, think of The Walking Dead as The Road Warrior, and Fear The Walking Dead as Mad Max.  That being said, I am still not sure that there’s enough there to differentiate it from the series that animates it (at least not for long), though it’s a bit more clever than I though it would be.