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The MEG – Trailer #1

Screenshot 2018-04-10 03.27.30A trailer just dropped for The MEG, a movie about a megalodon going around doing what sharks do in movies, which is eating humans (despite the fact that we’re by no means a normal part of their diet).

Though I have other problems with this trailer.  First off, the book this movie is based on is named ‘MEG,’ not ‘The MEG.’

It’s a small point but it makes a difference.  ‘MEG’ is short for ‘megalodon.’  ‘The’ MEG is just dumb and unnecessary.

Besides, when I see The MEG, The BFG pops in my head, which is probably not what the producers intend.

Then there’s the cast., which like Pacific Rim: Uprising seems designed to make an impression in China (and that’s understandable.  After all, one of the production companies is Chinese, though it doesn’t need to be as blatant as it is.

Then there’s the trailer, which starts off like a little like Jaws 3D (the one with Lou Gossett Jr) combined with Deep Star Six then turns into Piranha (the remake directed by Alexandre Aja. not the Joe Dante original).

It’s early days yet, but beyond seeing Jason Statham kick ass I can’t find any reason why I’d want to see this (and I tend to like shark movies, despite knowing how outlandish they tend to be).

The (Un)necessary Remake Dept – Tourist Trap

Tourist Trap posterDavid Schmoeller’s 1979 movie Tourist Trap is a particularly effective horror movie–particularly due to the score by Charles Band, speaking of whom doesn’t get nearly enough credit for his composing, which here is at times playful, harrowing and cinematic–that unfortunately is showing its age.

The movie revolves around a tourist attraction, Slaussens Lost Oasis, where Mr. Slaussen (Chuck Connors) owns a museum that showcases the mannikins that are the work of his brother, who’s more than little bit insane.

Slaussen tries to keep his brother hidden–in a way very similar to Hitchcock’s Psycho–but his brother refuses to stay put, preferring to escape from the house he’s held in to lure tourists to their deaths.

The premise of this movie is awesome, and doesn’t actually need that much in the way of tinkering story-wise, other than to bring the special effects more in line with modern sensibilities and technologies.

It’s also worth mentioning that, Besides Psycho, the movie also has more than a passing similarity to Brian DePalma’s Carrie, (which came out three years earlier) yet despite this it somehow manages to be not only original, but its own animal.

It goes without saying that effects need to be practical because it would work best when there’s actually something that actors are acting against (which is typically the case, though there are some instances when it CGI is perhaps a better fit, though not in this movie).

Another thing with mentioning is that what makes Tourist Trap as effective as it is is that the acting (particularly by Jocelyn Jones as Molly and Connors that elevates the material beyond many better known examples of the horror genre).

In fact, I suspect that the writers of the 2012 remake of Maniac (Alexandre Aja and Grégory Levasseur) must have at least heard of Tourist Trap because it plays very similar, especially in its third act.

Goodnight Mommy – Trailer

For awhile France was the place to go for innovative horror (and where directors like Alexandre Aja and Xavier Gens hail), now it seems that there’s been a shift to Australia.  Wyrmwood: Road Of The Dead is currently on Netflix, and it’s pretty clever–in terms of where it takes zombie horror, not so much in terms of visuals.

And Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz’s Goodnight Mommy looks to continue the trend.

Visually, the movie reminds me of Funny Games (for some reason) and revolves around two twin boys.  Their mother returns to their remote home (which is good for chasing your kids for prolonged periods, due to the isolation) to recover from plastic surgery on her face, and the boys aren’t too sure she’s actually their mother.

When I originally heard the synopsis, I thought that it was a case of the twins being bat-shite crazy (like Dead Ringers with little kids), and their mother spending most of the movie fleeing, though if the trailer is at all accurate, the boys may be on to something.

Are Facebook and YouTube Part Of The Piracy Problem?

Facebook logoThe rules, as far as pirating content on either Facebook or YouTube goes, I find very odd and very inconsistent.  For instance, five or six months ago, I posted a video that I made from a trip to the National Air and Space Museum.  I filmed some of the exhibits and set them to music–Cy Curnin’s Strange Ways, a most awesome song from an even more awesome albumand posted the video to Facebook, when it was soon pulled.

I later learned that this was because of the musical accompaniment.

Now my question is: I clearly didn’t ask Curnin to use his song, though is that the same as ‘stealing’ content?

And isn’t stealing in some ways is similar to murder, in that you can’t murder someone by accident (though you could not intend to kill someone, which the law recognizes as manslaughter– despite its obviously patriarchal origins).

Though back on point, considering that I purchased the music that I used in the video, wasn’t my usage only an extension of the rights that accompanied that purchase in the first place?

Or do I, as someone who’s actually purchased the song, have any rights at all as far as its usage goes?

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Horns – Review

Alexandre Aja is one of the most consistently interesting horror directors working today.  His Maniac remake–which he wrote with his writing partner, Grégory Levasseur–was excellent, and the work he did direct, such as High Tension (a fascinating movie that irritates the Hell out of me–in an Usual Suspects kind of way.  It’s a long story), The Hills Have Eyes reboot, Mirrors, for the most part are sublime.

Which has a lot to do with his last film, Horns, is so disappointing.

I haven’t read the novel by Joe Hill (son of Stephen King), but I would hope that his writing isn’t as erratic, as schizophrenic as this movie was.

My biggest gripe is that I had no idea why things were happening.  For instance, the movie opens during a murder investigation, and everyone–including his parents and brother–believes Ig Perrish (Daniel Radcliffe) is guilty.

The problem with this is that he (Spoiler Alert!) didn’t do it, but despite this fact he finds himself growing horns (?), which have two wildly inconsistent abilities.

So let’s for a moment forget that Ig is innocent, which means that there’s no justification for devil’s horns to suddenly start growing out of his head.

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‘The Pyramid’ Trailer

The found footage horror movie, The Pyramid, makes a point of mentioning that it’s produced by Alexandre Aja, the director of the reboot of The Hills Have Eyes (possibly the most ‘wholesome’ horror film I have ever seen), Mirrors and High Tension, among others.  What it doesn’t tell you is that it’s directed by Grégory Lavasseur, who’s Aja’s writing partner.   

In other words, what’s being implied is that you’ll somehow find the movie terrifying because of the influence of Aja, though looking at the trailer, I am not at all certain.

And while I think it’s just a coincidence, the trailer seems quite similar to Legendary’s As Above, So Below (both apparently feature people spending time running in terror through subterranean caverns), which is probably not a good thing.

 

‘Horns’ Teaser Trailer

I don’t get this movie.  There’s a small town, heinous crimes involving young women and someone played by Daniel Radcliffe growing horns.  Horns was written by Joe Hill, who happens to be the son of Stephen King.  He’s probably not as prolific as his dad (which means that he’ll produce a full-length novel only every other week).

What’s in the movie’s favor is that it was directed by Alexandre Aja, who did High Tension, the reboot of The Hills Have Eyes (awesome movie, for my money the most wholesome horror film I have ever seen.  I’d make it mandatory family viewing) and Mirrors.

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