Wreck–It–Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks The Internet – Official Trailer

It’s odd that from the opening to about midway the trailer for Wreck–It–Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks The Internet feels more like the original trailer for Tron–also from Disney–than it does anything else.

Though it eventually finds its footing and ends in a surprising bit of gore (though this being a Disney Animation joint, none of it is seen–though one little kid is apparently scared for life).

And for sake of comparison, here’s the trailer for Tron.

Advertisements

Not-So-Bright Mistake?

I just finished watching Bright on Netflix, and it was okay (review forthcoming) though a few minutes prior I noticed an email from studioADI (the guys who supposedly–a word I use because I wasn’t there, and have no idea of what went on one way or the other–did a lot of the practical effects on the movie) saying that their entire crew was left out of the credits!

And that’s really, really odd and something I’ve never heard of happening before.

Reviews Have Begun To Drop For Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets

Reviews have begun to drop for Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, and while it’s early days yet, let’s just say they haven’t been charitable.

The Hollywood Reporter’s Todd McCarthy was particularly tough on Besson’s latest effort, saying, ‘Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets really is that bad, bad enough you don’t know for longest time that Valerian is one of the lead characters and not a planet or a spaceship.’

Ouch.

Steve Pond  of The Wrap was slightly more charitable, saying ‘(Luc) Besson takes all that fun and color, along with a wild array of fantastic creatures, and deploys (them) in service of a big, dopey story that remains resolutely uninvolving and quite often annoying.’

Now, as I said earlier, it’s early days yet and a few mediocre reviews aren’t likely enough to torpedo Valerian’s chances at the domestic box office (after all, it’s taken five movies before many moviegoers in the United States noticed that the Transformers movies are really, really bad).

Though I get the feeling at that we’re not going to see Spider-Man: Homecoming-type box office when the movie goes into wide release.

Movie Magic: The Black Panther (Captain America: Civil War)

These days as a mover goer I know full well that practical effects combined with CGI can create virtually any type of effect imaginable. 

Though what I find infinitely more interesting is when a movie’s special effects are so seamless that I don’t know that what I happen to be looking at is a special effect, which brings me to Captain America: Civil War.  

<center€

There were two scenes where I recall the Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) was a full-on CGI character: when he was sliding down the side of a building when chasing the Winter Soldoer (Sebastian Stan) and another when he was slowing hinself down after momentum carried him beyond the Soldier in a second confrontation.

Beyond those two instances, I assumed that the character–as well as many of the locations–were entirely practical.  

Imagine my surprise to learn that virtually every scene featuring the Panther had three or four layers of CGI over a practical stuntman, and most of the locations were CGI enhanced as well!

Movie magic indeed.  

Cars 3 – Teaser Trailer

The first time I had seen the Cars 3 teaser trailer was during Rogue One: A Star Wars Story and someone seated nearby remarked:

“That’s pretty dark for a Pixar movie.”

Whoever this astute moviegoer was, he took the words right out of my mouth because not only is this trailer–tonally speaking–dark but it makes the movie that came afterward almost optimistic in retrospect.  

The Fog (2005) – Postmortem

Screenshot 2016-08-23 23.05.50.pngAs I have said time and again, I am not fond of remakes.

More often than not they don’t add anything to the original–did we really need to know about Michael Myers difficult upbringing in Rob Zombie’s Halloween reboot?–or they add details that seemingly are there just to differentiate them from the original.

The thing is, as far as remarks go, Rupert Wainwright’s remake of The Fog (it doesn’t help that  John Carpenter directed the original) isn’t terrible.

It’s not particularly good, but it’s different enough that you don’t at least hate yourself for wasting an hour and a half that you will never get back.

What works is the whole leprosy subplot–in the original I don’t recall the movie going into huge detail about what William Blake was doing with the gold–but in the reboot the point was to get his people to a place where they could live in peace because they were suffering from leprosy.

He was building a leper colony!  It’s a pretty clever idea that the movie unfortunately doesn’t take advantage of (there’s a scene where one of the ghosts comes in physical contact with a person, and she’s decays like she’s caught leprosy on steroids).

Unfortunately it’s an angle that they don’t deal with again.

They could have also done more innovative things with the fog itself, especially when you take into account that the bulk of it is CGI, but unfortunately they don’t.

It’s a movie full of wasted opportunities–especially compared to the original–but at least you don’t feel your time slipping away like digital fog.

 

Godzilla: Resurgence – Trailer

Independence Day isn’t the only movie that’s enjoyed a ‘resurgence’ as of late. Most recently, Godzilla has joined to club with Godzilla: Resurgence

And I honestly think that you see more of Godzilla in the trailer than you do in the entirety of Gareth Edwards’ 2014 eponymously named movie.

Screenshot 2016-07-19 19.35.34

That being said, as much as I wanted to see more of the big lizard, having done so I recall the adage ‘Be careful of what you ask for, you just might get it’ because this version of Toho Co.’s venerable kaiju looks a bit…weird.

Check out the scrawny arms and dissicated-looking skin.  He shares some visual cues with a tyrannosaur, though looks oddly zombified and more than a bit terrifying.

Which is interesting because traditionally Godzilla has never looked particularly scary.  Its (which has been at various times male and female, I think) primarily claim to fame were its humongous size, Japanese city-crushing tendencies, and radioactive breath.

Visually?  Always interesting, though honestly never evoked a reaction one way or another.

This most recent version?  Monstrous.

I also like that it still seems to still be a guy in a rubber suit.  Sure, technically speaking you can do less with a more practical Godzilla, but there’s one thing it its favor:  It’s actually there.