Pacific Rim: Uprising – Teaser Trailer

1993’s kaiju versus giant robots epic Pacific Rim never appeared to find its audience domestically–earning three times more ($102 million vs $309 million) at the foreign box office (primarily China). 

And it’s hard to understand why, epecially when you take into account it had more heart and was more clever in it’s first five minutes the all the Transmorphers movies combined (that’s not a typo.  I despise those movies so much I dare not type their names) and those made gobs of money. 

On the strength of the aforementioned foreign box recepts we’re getting a sequel: Pacific Rim: Uprising (speaking of which, who’s doing the ‘uprising?’  The first movie revolved around extra dimensional beings who entered this world through a rift in the bottom of the Pacific Ocean though the subtitle implies a significant change in relationship between humans and the aliens).  

What I know for certain is that Guillermo Del Toro will not be directing this time around (that honor goes to Steven DeKnight). 

And I am not sure how I feel about that.  Part of my problem is that I tend to over-emphasize with Del Toro (a person I have never met, and vice versa) on the strength of his movies.  

I really–somewhat irrationally, I know–really want him to succeed despite there being little (other than having seen a well put together and interesting movie) benefit or incentive for me to feel that way. 

Though there’s also the feeling that so many lesser directors manage to be much more successful on top of  the list of projects he has either abandoned or never got to make (The Hobbit and At the Mountains of Madness come to mind though I’m still holding out for the latter) for various reasons. 

Though if anyone were to replace Del Toro, Steven DeKnight is a great choice (check him out on Twitter at @stevendeknight he’s interesting, opinionated and refreshingly free of bs and pretentiousness). 

Kind of like Del Toro himself. 

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Daredevil (2015) Ep. 13: Daredevil

New York Bulletin - Daredevil editionRed costume, red costume, red costume.  Did I mention that I REALLY want to see the red costume?  Curse you, DeKnight!  Curse you!  And the worse thing is, I have already partially seen it–Curse you, Internet!  Curse you to Hell!–but I can tell that they don’t do it justice.

I thought that I should mention that Fisk is tough!–as if we didn’t know–the man takes a prolonged tase to the neck and just keeps on  killing.

Though apparently not tough enough because this is the penultimate episode, and in it we witness what looks to me like the start of the fall of Wilson Fisk’s organization, though with Vanessa free I get the feeling that we will be seeing the Kingpin of Crime again soon enough.

Red costumeBy the way, the new costume is AWESOME!  My only issue is the placement of the eyes, which look like they’re situated a bit too low on his face.

Other than that, it’s actually better than the costume in Ben Affleck’s version, which is saying something because that was pretty good.

Daredevil (2015) Ep. 12: The Ones We Leave Behind

Last episode, Melvin Potter went to work designing a costume for the Devil, because he told him that he would save whoever Fisk was threatening to keep him in thrall.

And speaking of Fisk, he’s getting shit from all sides.  Vanessa is poisoned in an attempt to get to him, and Karen Page ends up shooting (and seemingly killing) Wesley.

But to more important matters:  It’s going to happen this episode!  There is no way show runner Steven DeKnight would be so incredibly lame as to reveal the red costume in the last, especially considering that her groundwork has been laid for it for the last three or four episodes prior.

AtlasThis is an interesting little Easter egg.  The sign on the office opposite Nelson & Murdock: Attorneys at Law is Atlas Investments.  The point being that the company that became Marvel Comics was known as Atlas Comics.

Take a look at the Atlas Investments logo, followed by that for Atlas Comics.  It’s pretty damn close.

Atlas Investments logo

Atlas Investments logo

Atlas logo

Atlas Comics logo

And I also get the feeling that I am not going to see that damn red costume till episode 13.  I’ve come this far, so it goes without saying that I am going all the way, though I’d be lying if I said that I wasn’t a bit impatient.

That being said.  HOLY CRAP!  Wait till you see the end of this episode.  It’s not the red suit, but it hits just as hard.

Netflix’s Daredevil Reviews Are Coming In…

Matt Murdock

Charlie Cox as Matt Murdock/Daredevil

..and the first I have read is from SuperHeroHype–and it’s pretty positive (effusively so, truth be told).

In fact, I suspect that it’s perhaps too rosy seeing that it appears that the reviewer has only seen the first of a 13-episode series.

Enthusiasm aside–after all, the site isn’t called SuperHeroHype for nothing–it’s a good sign that the opener has received such accolades so early in the game.

The series doesn’t begin with Murdock sporting his red costume, though that’s supposed turn up at some point before the series finishes its run.  What I am also  curious about is how show runner Steven DeKnight will handle action scenes because having seen some of the last series he’s worked on–Spartacus–I think the whole 300 thing of having pivotal action scenes in slow motion is pretty irritating.

Though I, as well as the rest of us mortals, will have to wait till April 10.

Steven DeKnight On ‘Daredevil’

I found this interview with Steven DeKnight, the showrunner for Netfilix’s upcoming series based on Marvel’s Daredevil, on Superherohype.  He actually give very little away, but does say that the series takes place in the 1970’s and that Vincent D’Onofrio is a really scary Kingpin.

He also mentions that things are going really well, though I suspect that he could be making the next Heaven’s Gate, and he would probably say the same thing.

Everything You Need to Know About ‘Daredevil’ Before It Premieres On Netflix, But Aren’t Geeky Enough To Ask

Screen Shot 2014-06-11 at 6.01.00 PMIf you needed another reason to love Marvel Studios–besides their awesome movies–it’s probably because they’re best at translating their characters to the screen, which is why when I heard that they were preparing to launch four new series exclusively for Netflix a few months ago, I was so happy that you’d think that I was somehow profiting from it.

The characters that they are using, Daredevil, Luke Cage, Iron Fist (which my fingers keep typing as ‘Iron Fish’) and Jessica Jones.  And like in Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, where the adventures of Iron Man, Thor, Captain America and the Hulk culminated in The Avengers, the characters on Netflix will meet and fight a common foe in The Defenders.

Who Is Daredevil?

Daredevil was created in 1964 by Stan Lee, Bill Everett and Jack Kirby and was introduced in Daredevil#1.  The character came by his powers when, as a child in Hell’s Kitchen, New York.  He was splashed by some radioactive substance that fell from a truck that was transporting it.  He lost his sight, but gained a radar sense that acted similar to a bat’s sonar.

His father, Jack Murdock, refused to throw a fight, and was killed by mobsters.  To avenge him, he created an alter ego called Daredevil, who’s known as The Man Without Fear.

It’s probably not an accident that Daredevil is in many ways very similar to Spider-Man.  Stan Lee had a hand in both characters, though this time he worked with Steve Ditko.  Both characters were raised by single parents–Matt Murdock by his father, while Peter Parker was brought up by his Aunt May after her husband, and his uncle, was killed.  Parker was bit by a radioactive spider, and like most radioactive substances in comics, gave him powers and abilities similar to the spider that bit him.

When he let’s a thief escape, the very same thief ends up killing his Uncle Ben.  Parker blamed himself for what happened, and dedicated his life to righting wrongs as Spider-Man.

Matt Murdoch was splashed in the eyes by a radioactive substance that spilled from a truck that was transporting it.  He didn’t get the proportional strength of a truck, though he did gain a radar sense, similar to the sonar bats use (and bats see quite well, by the way.  Their navigational technique, known as echolocation helps then to catch prey in the dark environs, or at night, that most bats prefer).

It will be interesting to see is how the makers of Daredevil will explain Daredevil’s athletic abilities, which in the comics seem on par with Spider-Man, despite being nothing more than a very athletic person with a radar sense.

Though Daredevil is similar to Spider-Man in other ways, such as some of their villains.

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